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KDE 3.5.5 Released

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KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.5, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

KDE now supports 65 languages, making it available to more people than most non-free software and can be easily extended to support others by communities who wish to contribute to the open source project.

Significant enhancements include:
*Version 0.12.3 of Kopete replaces 0.11.3 in KDE 3.5.5, it includes support for Adium themes, performance improvements and better support for the Yahoo! and Jabber protocols.
*Support for sudo in kdesu.
*Support for input shape from XShape1.1 in KWin (KDE window manager).
*Lots of speed improvements and fixes in Konqueror's HTML engine, KHTML.
*CUPS 1.2 support in KDEPrint.
*Big improvements in the number of translated interface elements in Chinese Traditional, Farsi, Khmer, Low Saxon and Slovak translations.

Full Announcement.

KDE 3.5.5 released with more than 1,200 changes

According to Sebastian Kügler, a developer with the KDE Project, "1,222 changes have gone into the release between 3.5.4 and 3.5.5 and 333 bugs have been marked as closed." Kügler says more than 100 people worked on the the code during this release cycle and they are most proud of its improved stability and numerous bugfixes in KHTML. "The KDE browser component is being used by Apple and Nokia as well, and in fact, it shows the significance of KDE technology in the wider software industry."

Full Story.

KDE 3.5.5 Changelog.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Good Stuff

We had a few niggles updating over 3.5.3 but overall it is a very good release.

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