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For Opera, smaller really is better

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Interviews

At last count, Opera had only about 1 percent of the Web browser market, so Microsoft's not exactly quaking in its boots. Still, Opera executives say the future will be increasingly dominated by browsers found in non-PC devices, especially on the proliferating number of handheld gadgets combining computing power with telephony.

Wium Lie, who works out of the company's home base in Norway, recently visited San Francisco, where he caught up with CNET News.com editors to discuss the state of browser technology.

Q: What is the latest target date for Opera 10?

Wium Lie: I can't give you an exact date just yet. We're releasing things all the time. We have some things that are going in there, and there are others things we don't know whether to include. I think you can expect things like phishing to be a focus. But whether we wait for Opera 10 to do that or do an update on Opera 9, I don't know.

In terms of downloads, where are you now with 9?

Full Story.

I also believe that Windows

I also believe that Windows Internet Explorere has been neglectful when it comes to updates and dealing with security problems. Up to date, there are still lingering complaints with regards to security issues comparing Internet explorer with other browsers like Mozilla foxfire. It just so happens that they control majority ofthe market, and sometimes people settle into their comfort zones. I, for one, use Internet Explorer; and one main reason is because I have settled into the comfort of familiarity. However, I would appreciate some improvements. And if other browsers can give me what Internet Explorer lacks, then why wouldn't I shift? As for hand-held gadgets, I think Opera's got some really great ideas that would make browsing more convenient than we've ever dreamed of.

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