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Book review: Beginning Ubuntu Linux: From Novice to Professional

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Are you, or do you know, a non-techie? A non-techie who takes pride in their lack of techno-savvy, who still clings to the belief that while other people might use GNU/Linux, it’s a bit technological for the likes of them? Someone who takes pride in being a passive computer user, who wants it all spelled out in black and white? Well here you go, ladies and gents, Beginning Ubuntu Linux takes everything about Ubuntu from before the moment you pick up distro CD, spells it out and sits you down and makes sure if there was a test, you’d get top marks. Beginning Ubuntu Linux is written by Keir Thomas, an author and editor for Apress’ open source line, and is published by Apress.

This book is really for people who want to use Linux but have little to no idea what they are doing—basically, ex-Windows converts who are keen but don’t know much. Given this context, what is great about the book is the tone Thomas sets in his writing—comforting and knowledgeable, but not at all pretentious. It’s a bit like having a really good teacher sitting with you—who is explaining everything to you patiently and isn’t getting cross when you ask stupid questions. Also, if you were feeling un-confident about migration, Beginning Ubuntu Linux is just the thing to make you feel like actually, you are in control and you can do it, because someone is with you giving you step-by-step instructions.

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