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Linux distro UBOS beta 11 released with support for Marvell EspressoBIN

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Linux

UBOS Beta 11 is here, and we are proud to add the Marvell EspressoBIN to the list of supported devices.

Launched on Kickstarter earlier this year, the EspressoBIN is an interesting board: it doesn’t have any graphics (which is fine with us because most UBOS devices are used as headless servers) but instead it has three Ethernet ports and a SATA connector. The currently available 1GB version costs only $49 on Amazon. So it’s perfect for running UBOS.

We have also verified that the Raspberry Pi Zero W (the $10 version that has WiFi) also works out of the box with UBOS.

Read more at http://ubos.net/blog/2017/06/11/beta11-available.html

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