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Reiser4 to go mainline?

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Linux
Reiser

Reiser4, the successor to the popular Reiserfs by Hans Reiser, has been in development for a number of years now and, for almost as long, Reiser has been pushing for inclusion of the filesystem in mainline — that is, to make it into the official kernel release. While reiserfs has been part of the kernel since 2.4.1, Reiser4 remains a feature offered only in third party kernel patchsets.

While still in development, the core inhibitors for Reiser4’s inclusion have possibly been more political than technical. Reiser is a passionate and outspoken developer who has, at times, rubbed some of the most respected kernel developers the wrong way. Still, he has listened to criticism and slowly but surely Reiser4 has been prepared to merge into mainline, thanks to reviews of the code and feedback by kernel developers.

So it was with interest that rumours recently spread on news and mailing lists that, finally, an inclusion of Reiser4 into mainline was imminent in the upcoming 2.6.19 or 2.6.20 kernels.

Full Story.

What’s with the ReiserFS data safety thing?

I constantly hear people badmouthing ReiserFS (V3). For example, see the comments on the APC article. I don’t really need to read an article to know that: even one of my college professors (who contributes to the Linux kernel) has told me so. I don’t know if it’s because people are misinformed… but I’ll pitch in with my two cents:

I don’t understand why people keep assigning blame on ReiserFS when they lose data because of faulty hardware. Ironically, the complexity of on-disk structures in ReiserFS filesystems is greatly derived by the fact that ReiserFS takes pains to ensure data is written properly, while tuning for performance.

I’ll tell a short story: I once had a 40 GB hard disk go bad on me, and it was ReiserFS-formatted, plus chock-full of my (then small) invaluable MP3 collection. How did that turn out? I only lost two files that used bad sectors. I didn’t have to use the reiserfsck tool. How’s that for resilience? Evidently, I still use Reiser (V3) to the day, in all of my disks.

How do I guard for data corruption?

Full Blog Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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