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Variscite Launches New Variants for the DART-6UL SoM with Improved Certified Wi-Fi/BT Module with 802.11 ac/a/b/g/n Support

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In a matter of only two months, Variscite has announced the launch of an additional enhancement for the DART-6UL System on Module (SoM) product line based on the NXP Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite family.

The newly-introduced DART-6UL-5G variants are enhanced with certified Wi-Fi/BT module with 802.11 ac/a/b/g/n and dual band 2.4/5 GHz support. Those variants provide improved performance and effective bit-rate over its Wi-Fi, an ideal solution for products requiring high data transfer rates over the wireless network.

The DART-6UL-5G variants will run alongside two popular early variants: Initial i.MX 6UL variants, recently enhanced with 696MHz processor speed grade, and low-power i.MX 6ULL variants. All variants can be satisfied within a very attractive price range - starting from only 24 USD.

The DART-6UL-5G is pin-to-pin compatible with other DART-6UL variants. Sharing the exact same features-set and variety of interfaces, all products are compact (only 25 x 50 mm), have optimized cost and power, boast a full -40 to 85 temperature range and carry a 15-year longevity commitment. Leveraging this rich feature set, the platform is commonly used in fast emerging applications, such as the Internet-of-Things, industrial-grade embedded applications and portable/battery operated embedded systems.

Variscite's production-ready software suit for the DART-6UL, covering Linux Yocto, Linux Debian and Android, delivers an all-inclusive solution, significantly easing development efforts and shortening time-to-market.

DART-6UL-5G key features include:
• Small size: 25 x 50 x 4 mm
• NXP i.MX 6UltraLite and 6ULL 528 MHz / 696 MHz ARM Cortex-A7 with optional security features
• Up to 512 MB DDR3L and 512 MB NAND / 32 GB eMMC
• Certified Wi-Fi/Bluetooth 802.11 ac/a/b/g/n Dual Band 2.4/5 GHz
• Dual 10/100Mbps Ethernet
• 2D Pixel acceleration engine
• Display: 24-bit parallel RGB up to WXGA
• Touchscreen controller
• Dual USB 2.0 OTG (Host/Device)
• Audio In/Out
• Dual CAN, UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, ADC
• Parallel camera input
• Industrial temperature grade
• OS: Linux Yocto, Linux Debian, Android

Availability and pricing:

The DART-6UL SoM and associated development kits are available now for orders in production quantities, starting at only 24 USD per unit.

About Variscite:
Variscite is a leading System on Modules (SoM) and Single-Board-Computer (SBC) design and manufacture company. A trusted provider of development and production services for a variety of embedded platforms, Variscite transforms clients' visions into successful products.

Learn more about Variscite visit www.variscite.com
For more information: Email sales@variscite.com or call +972 9 9562910

http://www.variscite.com/company/newsroom/item/432-dart-6ul-5g-enhanced-wi-fi-btnews-release

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