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Scaling the Windows vs. Linux Chasm

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There's a popular notion swirling around the high-tech sector that Microsoft's dominant position in the industry and software bugs have customers scurrying for the cover of Linux.

This may be more of a myth than a notion, Gartner analyst John Enck said during a session comparing the two operating systems at the Gartner Symposium ITxpo here.

"We're just not seeing any sort of motion away from Windows towards Linux," Enck said.

Enck said that by 2011, enterprises that migrate to Linux will do so because of the quality of applications built on top of the operating systems, from software distributors like Red Hat and Novell, as well as the variety of new-fangled distros such as Debian, Gentoo and Ubuntu.

The analyst expects to see Linux and Windows will play key roles in more than 60 percent and 80 percent of data centers, respectively.

"We think that these are significant platforms that are going to really be able to maintain a significant place in the enterprise going forward," Enck said.
Moreover, Microsoft and Linux will continue to scarf new license market share, making the race an interesting one to watch.

Something has to give, of course.

Full Story.

The door’s open

It’s been more than five years since Microsoft released Windows XP. Now, the software giant is readying XP’s successor, Vista. Will the new version be worth the price and pain of upgrading? More importantly, is Windows still relevant?

That might seem like an odd question. Windows is still, after all, the dominant operating system (OS) on desktop computers. Yet, the world is changing. Microsoft is facing a formidable rival in Linux, the open source OS, and in Google, the Internet media giant.

Full Story.
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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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