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HP all-in-one device works great with Linux

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Hardware

I recently replaced both my Epson CX5400 All-in-one printer/scanner and my Brother MFC-210C fax/copier with a single all-in-one Hewlett-Packard Officejet 5610. Not only does the new product do more than both of the machines it replaced, it does it in less space. The price isn't real big, either.

Unpacking and setting up the Officejet 5610 took me less than 15 minutes. The hardest part of the job was locating all the places where things had been taped shut for shipping. The power cord, USB cable (not included), and the phone line all connect to the back of the unit. Everything else is done up front, including routine chores like feeding paper and changing ink cartridges.

Once the ink cartridges have been installed and aligned -- the unit first prints an alignment page, then scans it to check for needed adjustment -- Windows and Mac OS users are told to load their respective CDs to install the drivers. Linux users can scoff at the intellectual property handcuffs imposed on their non-free brothers and sisters and simply configure the unit from the friendly confines of their distribution.

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