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Fedora 5 Unleashed & SELinux by Example

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Usually I prefer to review books one at a time. Since I like to not only read the book I’m reviewing but apply some of the suggestions, it makes to evaluate it from an average user’s point of view as well, trying to cover more than one book per review is difficult.

In the case of these two books, though, my usual practices have to be ignored. These two books not only need to be reviewed together, they need to be purchased and read together. Allow me to expand on my reasoning.

Fedora Core is, in my experience, the first Linux distribution to include setting up SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux) as part of its installation routine. Even though SELinux is supported by Debian and Gentoo, Fedora is the only OS I’ve encountered that presents the opportunity to setup SELinux during installation. Having both these books at hand while setting up Fedora Core 5 will leave you with no unanswered questions.

Red Hat Fedora 5 Unleashed is a massive book.

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