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Gentoo-Based Chrome OS for Work, Gentoo Sources Change

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Introducing Chrome Enterprise

    Since we launched Chrome OS in 2009, our goal has been to build the simplest, fastest, and most secure operating system possible. And we’ve been inspired by all the ways we’ve seen businesses embrace Chrome, from Chromebooks in the office, to shared Chrome devices in the field, to signage and kiosks for customer engagement in retail. But with so many different business needs—not to mention so many different devices—companies have also told us they want a single, cost-effective solution that gives them the flexibility and control to keep their employees connected. That’s why today we’re announcing Chrome Enterprise.

  • Google Rolls Out Chrome Enterprise: Chrome OS For Work

    Google has today announced Chrome Enterprise as a subscription service to take Chrome OS and Chromebooks into more work environments.

    Chrome Enterprise makes Chrome OS more friendly for professional work environments and lets IT/administrators manage Chrome extensions, printers, handle operating system updates, and provides other features like single sign-on support and more. Chrome Enterprise costs $50 USD per device per year and includes 24/7 enterprise support.

  • Switch to Gentoo sources

    You've might already read it on the Gentoo news site, the Hardened Linux kernel sources are removed from the tree due to the grsecurity change where the grsecurity Linux kernel patches are no longer provided for free. The decision was made due to supportability and maintainability reasons.

    That doesn't mean that users who want to stick with the grsecurity related hardening features are left alone. Agostino Sarubbo has started providing sys-kernel/grsecurity-sources for the users who want to stick with it, as it is based on minipli's unofficial patchset. I seriously hope that the patchset will continue to be maintained and, who knows, even evolve further.

    Personally though, I'm switching to the Gentoo sources, and stick with SELinux as one of the protection measures. And with that, I might even start using my NVidia graphics card a bit more, as that one hasn't been touched in several years (I have an Optimus-capable setup with both an Intel integrated graphics card and an NVidia one, but all attempts to use nouveau for the one game I like to play - minecraft - didn't work out that well).

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