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How I triple booted my x60 with Ubuntu, XP and Vista and got to repair my MBR too!

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HowTos

Today I successfully installed Vista on my ibm X60 after obtaining a copy of RC2. I also installed Office 2007 Beta. Now I’ve got a triple boot IBM x60 that’s almost too cool for me to type on.

Where I work we’re expecting to see Vista machines come January when it starts shipping from vendors installed on computers. So, while Windows is not my OS of choice, I’ve still got to support it. Being the geek that I am I also get a thrill whenever I install a new and untried OS, so this allowed me to start learning and be my geeky self.

One interesting thing about Vista (and XP as well) is that when you install it on a machine that uses some other bootloader, Grub in my case, it will blow away and rewrite the Master Boot Record without so much as a shrug.

Here’s what I did to install it. (If you’re interested in how to restore grub, see my previous post).

Full Story.


Related:

I’ve recently installed Vista as the third OS on my laptop. Of course, when I did, it blew away my MBR and my computer forgot all about grub. Then I couldn’t boot into Ubuntu and I was not a happy camper. Although truthfully, I expected this to happen, it being a Windows install.

Fixing this is surprisingly easy. Here’s how to do it:

How to restore Grub to your MBR using the Ubuntu 6.06 live cd.

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