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Software: PulseAudio, PiCluster, Wikit, massif-visualizer, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Elisa, and GNOME

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Software
  • News: New release of PulseAudio.
  • PiCluster – A Simple, Web-based Docker Management Application

    PiCluster is a simple, open source, web-based docker management application used to manage Docker containers across multiple hosts. Unlike Docker Swarm or Kubernetes, PiCluster is easy to setup and use. The latest PiCluster version has brought new features. It makes the process of creating containers much easier than ever. Say for example, the users can now upload a zip of their Dockerfile’s to the PiCluster web console and the files will be copied to every node and extracted in the Docker directory specified in PiCluster config file. Also, when a container is added, the image will be automatically built and run in a single step. In previous releases, users would have to manually create the container. It will work on both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms.

  • Wikit – Get Wikipedia Summaries From Commandline In Linux

    Wikipedia has several millions of articles and the number of articles are steadily increasing every single day. It is the first place that comes to my mind when I’m looking for knowledge. Today, I have stumbled upon a simple, yet useful command-line utility called “Wikit”. It displays the summary of any Wikipedia article in Terminal. As we all know already, the Wikipedia has the largest and most comprehensive articles. If you don’t want to waste time to read a comprehensive Wikipedia article, you can then use Wikit to get Wikipedia summaries from commandline. To be precise, Wikit will display the first few paragraphs (the summary, of course) before the table of contents of a Wikipedia article.

  • massif-visualizer 0.7.0 released

    Massif Visualizer is a visualiser for output generated by Valgrind’s massif tool. It shows you graphs which measure how much heap memory your program uses.

  • Kdenlive 17.08.1 released

    Although the team is at full throttle getting ready for the 17.12 big refactoring release, we make available the first point release of the 17.08 series bringing various bugfixes and usability improvements. Stay tuned for testing the refactoring branch packages to be announced soon.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Released, Focuses on Stability

    A new version of OpenShot, the crash-happy open-source non-linear video editor, is available to download. While the previous couple of releases were big on features the latest release is a “stability-focused release”, says project lead Jonathan Thomas.

  • OpenShot 2.4.0 Released | Improved Stability & More!

    The latest and greatest version of OpenShot Video Editor (version 2.4.0) has been officially released, and I'm proud to bring you all the details! This is a stability-focused release, and much of the effort was "behind-the-scenes" type work.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Brings Better Stability To This Open-Source Video Editor

    Jon Thomas has announced the release of the OpenShot Video Editor 2.4 released. Among the features of OpenShot 2.4 are "vastly improved stability" for this non-linear, cross-platform video editor.

  • Essential Tools for Producing High Quality Podcasts on Linux

    Podcasts are a booming business, and many audio pros are seeing more and more work dedicated to this platform. Mac and Windows users have plenty of options for professionally recording and mastering audio, but Linux users aren’t quite as lucky. Yet if you really love the penguin, there are still awesome podcast tools for producing high-quality podcasts on Linux.

  • Twitter Finally Rolls Out Night Mode Feature to Linux, Windows and Mac Users

    The long-anticipated Night Mode feature is ready to conquer your desktop, help stop eye strain, and help you fall asleep after a long night of twittering. The feature is currently rolling out to the desktop version of twitter.com and should be supported on all modern web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

  • Elisa, Accessibility and other News

    I should be communicating more often about development related to the Elisa music player. Recently Safa Alfulaij added support for right-to-left interface. This is a very good excuse to talk about what happened since my previous post.

  • GNOME 3.26rc2 (2.25.92) RELEASED
  • GNOME 3.26 RC2 Released: The Final Step For This Big GNOME Update

    GNOME 3.25.92 is available today, marking the last development release before the official GNOME 3.26 debut.

  • EA's Frostbite Engine Has Been Internally Up And Running On Linux

    While not for public consumption at least for now, the Electronic Arts' Frostbite game engine has seen internal Linux testing/development.

    EA developer Johan Andersson was comparing the size of the Linux kernel source tree to that of their Frostbite game engine: there are more files, lines, comments, and code in Frostbite than in the Linux kernel. Johan has been a technical fellow and director at EA since 2000.

  • Shuffle the Decks with These Ace Open Source Card Games

    A card game is a game that uses playing cards as the main way the game is played. The cards can be a standard deck of 52 French playing cards with 4 suits of Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, and Clubs. Or the cards can be game-specific. There is a plethora of card games available, with families of related games.

    Card games offer many positive attributes. They can improve mental skills, memory and logic. They can test your patience, help you focus, and are popular for all ages. Having a good memory is essential to a person’s overall well-being. A good way to improve memory is playing fun games. Whether it’s a board game or a deck of cards, putting your brain to work definitely has its advantages. The earlier a person who has a poor working memory can begin to strengthen it, the more successful they’ll be in life.

More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds

Arch Linux vs. Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu Benchmarks

Last week when sharing the results of tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 to try to make it run as fast as Clear Linux, it didn't take long for Phoronix readers to share their opinions on Arch Linux and the request for some optimized Arch Linux benchmarks against Clear Linux. Here are some results of that testing so far in carrying out a clean Arch Linux build with some basic optimizations compared to using Antergos Minimal out-of-the-box, Ubuntu Server, and Clear Linux. Tests this time around were done on the Intel Core i9 7980XE system with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 Corsair memory, GeForce GTX 750, and Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe solid-state drive. The system with 18 cores / 36 threads does make for quick and easy compiling of many Linux packages. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.