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FSG Launches Tools, LSB Developers Network With Linux Apps in Mind

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To help spur the creation of a lot more applications for Linux, the Free Standards Group (FSG) and technical publishing firm O'Reilly Media have launched the Linux Standard Base (LSB) Developer Network (LDN), a developer's network loosely modeled after the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN).

In an interview with LinuxPlanet, Ian Murdock, the FSB's CTO, said. that the new LDN encompasses downloadable development tools aimed mostly at helping developers comply with the latest edition of FSG's LSB specification. The tools have been tested over recent months by software development players such as MySQL, RealNetworks, and Google.

But the new online community also includes a number of other offerings aimed at making the standard--which defines interfaces, rather than underlying architecture--"more relevant" to developers of various persuasions, according to Murdock, who founder of the Debian Project.

"The LSB is only a good thing if it is actionable," said Murdock.

Full Story.

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