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KDE is leading the way, admit its competitors

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KDE

Earlier today I came across an article that made me smile.

A quote first:

“Gnome will join OSC’s Community Advisory Board and work with the OSC to promote the open source desktop.” (from the article)

Another one:

“…the (Gnome) Foundation will hope to raise the profile and acceptance of its interface as a standard for open-source systems throughout Europe. Gnome’s rival KDE has a significant hold on Linux desktops in Europe, so the move also advances Gnome’s chances of gaining market share.” (from the article)

What does it mean? Well, to me it means three things, two for sure, and another one not-so-sure.

The first sure thing is: KDE is leading the way for the Linux desktop adoption, which is expressed in the growing movement away from the MS monopoly. And you can see the recognition in the quotes above, as well as in various poll results and studies.

The thing I am unsure about is this (so let me put it as an open question): Are our friends from the camp of the other, the second biggest desktop, now giving up targeting MS market share? Are they now shifting focus to bite into KDE’s “market share” as their main purpose of existence? Well, there is no reason to be afraid. Knowing what kind of killer applictions for the enterprise and government market are currently maturing inside the official KDE code base, there is no way anyone could easily remove KDE users’ loyality and make them switch.

The second sure thing is: KDE market share may be a worthwhile target for the other big Open Source desktop, as KDE is much bigger – but this is not true the other way round. I do not see any need or inclination for KDE to attack Gnome, as long as there are still well over 90% desktop workstations on MS Windows. KDE’s most substantial growth in the future, short and middle term lies with the companies and governments that want to switch away from Microsoft.

Full Developer's Blog and discussion.

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