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OSS: Sharing, Hadoop, AI, Symphony Software Foundation and Shakthi Kannan

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OSS
  • Need for speed unites open source and corporations for new serverless tech

    The open-source community used to thrive on rebellion against profitable proprietary corporations like Microsoft Corp. and others. All have since reconciled, and are now joining forces to fight common enemies holding back agile development.

    “Open source doesn’t have that enemy anymore. It’s the standard,” said John Furrier (@furrier) (pictured, right), co-host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio. “So the questions is what is going to motivate the organizations?”

  • Evolving Government: Why government needs open-source deep learning

    Deep learning is cutting edge artificial intelligence. It’s what Google used to build AlphaGo, which beat the world champion of board game Go earlier this year in China. It’s what powers a lot of self-driving cars, by giving their machine vision human-level accuracy. And it’s being used by many of the world’s top tech companies as the basis for recommender systems, fraud detection and cybersecurity.

    [...]

    Open-source software is the bedrock of enterprise and government applications, from Linux through to Hadoop. The next layer to go open-source is AI, and that’s great news for government agencies. But open-source alone is insufficient: those agencies should make sure their tools till play well with others in the stack, so that they can march their AI solutions to the finish line. During our time in the government-focused startup accelerator, DCode42, the Skymind team learned firsthand the kind of partner and collaboration that agencies and departments require to adopt and implement new technology.

  • Open Source Artificial Intelligence: 50 Top Projects

    For this list, we selected 50 of the most well-known of these open source artificial intelligence projects. They are organized into categories and then alphabetized within those categories. The lines between some of the categories can be fuzzy, so we used the project owners' descriptions of their applications to determine where to place the various tools.

  • Symphony Software Foundation Launches Open Source Strategy Forum

    - Symphony Software Foundation (the Foundation), the nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software, will be hosting its inaugural Open Source Strategy Forum at the BNY Mellon Conference Center in New York on November 8, 2017. Registration is open today.

  • Shakthi Kannan – the Free and Open Source Software ‘Shakthimaan’

        

    Our Techie Tuesdays of the week, Shakthi Kannan dons the hats of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) advocate, documentation expert, and DevOps engineer with ease. 

    Impeccably attired, Shakthi Kannan was half an hour early for our meeting, which, in essence, describes the man – meticulous and a perfectionist.

More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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