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Ed Warnicke's Talk About Networking and DevOps

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  • Open-source tech unites networking and DevOps

    In the tech world, innovation and new systems are great, but nothing moves unless the network can handle it. This truth makes networking very important for businesses, because a company can only be as agile as its network. Part of that agility comes from making the network easy to use. Open-source tech is coming to the rescue.

    “The truth is, there’s a lot of work that goes into making the network invisible and ubiquitous for people,” said Ed Warnicke (pictured), distinguished consulting engineer at Cisco Systems Inc. “In particular, one of the challenges that we see arising as the world moves more cloud native, as the microservices get smaller, as the … the shift happens toward serverless, as Kubernetes [container orchestration management] is coming on with containers is that the network is really becoming the runtime, and that runtime has the need to scale and perform like it never has before.”

  • Open Source Summit: It's Time for DevOps and Networking to Talk

    Warnicke delivered a lighting keynote talk titled, Bridging the Divide: Brining Network and DevOps People Together to Build a Unified Cloud Native Future. Warnicke started off his talk by outlining the shift in networking over the last decade from bare metal server needs to virtual machines.

    With Virtual Machines, networking vendors built overlay network topologies and approaches that have enabled virtual networking

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