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Linux Foundation Event and Initiatives

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Linux
  • Torvalds Wants Hackers on Linux's Team Instead of Going to 'Dark Side’

    Today’s topics include Linus Torvalds wanting hackers to join Linux before turning to the “dark side”; an Apache Struts vulnerability being the potential cause of the Equifax breach; ScanMyPhotos.com offering free photo digitizing to Texas and Florida residents; and Google’s appeal of its $2.9 billion EU antitrust fine.

    At the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles on Sept. 11, Linux founder Linus Torvalds said one way to improve security is to get hackers to join Linux before they attack us. He also said the concept of absolute security in Linux doesn't exist.

    "Even if we do a perfect job … let's be honest, there will always [be] bugs,"Torvalds said. There are a lot of security checks to help identify vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel. Therefore, as a technical person he is impressed by the ingenuity of the people who attack Linux code.

  • New Initiatives to Create Sustainable Open Source Projects at The Linux Foundation

    Open source software isn’t only growing. It’s actually accelerating exponentially in terms of its influence on technology and in society.

  • Linux Foundation: Announcing Our Open Source Guides for the Enterprise

    Last March we held a TODO Group track at Open Source Leadership Summit focused entirely on sharing best practices for businesses managing and building out open source programs. More than a dozen open source program leads and other leaders from companies shared their tips and best practices at the event.

    Furthermore in the last year or so, we have seen companies like AWS build out an open source program via @AWSOpen and even companies like VMWare hired their first Chief Open Source Officer. We’ve had many organizations approach TODO Group members asking for advice on how to get started with an open source program.

  • OPNFV Membership Grows Globally as Community Plans Fourth Developer Plugfest

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

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