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IBM and RH Join Forces to Enhance Linux Knowledge

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Linux

To better prepare college students for the jobs of tomorrow, IBM and Red Hat are working together to collaborate with educators in teaching students the open source, standards-based skills necessary to compete for the information technology jobs of tomorrow.

Through the IBM Academic Initiative and Red Hat Academy programs, the two organizations will collaborate with educators on several levels, including Linux skills-building and curriculum development. This initiative expands upon an ongoing relationship between IBM and Red Hat, which have worked together to deliver Linux solutions to the enterprise since 1999.

Linux continues to be the fastest growing operating system, according to IDC, and some analysts project it will overtake Windows in new server shipments in the next few years. IBM's own research at 3,000 colleges and universities worldwide highlights a strong need for open standards-based offerings. A survey of 450 global CEOs by IBM Business Consulting Services revealed that 75 percent of the CEOs surveyed cited education and the lack of qualified candidates as the issues that will have the greatest impact on their business over the next three years.

"There is an increasing demand for high-value, high-paying jobs that require skills in open standards technologies like Linux," said Gina Poole, vice president, Developer Relations and the IBM Academic Initiative, IBM. "We are pleased to be working with our long-time business partner, Red Hat, to help students develop the cutting-edge technology skills they need, especially in open source technology."

Working together, IBM and Red Hat will help institutions educate students and generate high-value job skills on Linux, as well as training on IBM software and servers. This relationship seeks to help spread the adoption of open standards around the world and will include the spectrum of higher education institutions, from large research universities to community colleges and vocational schools. Upon graduation, students will understand the relevance and power of open standards and business on demand. They will possess the necessary skills for employment, including mastery of Linux.

"Open Source skills are highly regarded by employers. This reflects the widespread adoption of Linux in the mainstream enterprise," said Peter Childers, vice president of Global Learning Services at Red Hat. "As leaders in technical training, Red Hat and IBM will be a trusted source for educators adding Linux to the curriculum."

Full Article.

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