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Fedora Core 6 Review

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I had pretty high expectations for Fedora Core 6 and in some ways they were met. FC 6 certainly is one of the best looking distro’s I have seen, especially for a default installation. but several smaller issue bugs that crept into FC 6 made me wonder how organized they really are. The problems I encountered with Fedora Core 6 were not huge issues, but there were enough smaller bugs that made me wonder if this release was rushed.

A bad omen would have been that on the day of release (October 24) the Fedora Core home page went down until further notice. Now the problem could have been with hardware but the message I got was that the Fedora Core team was ill prepared and a lack of planning may have caused their webpage to go down (at the most unfortunate time). Since their primary “business” (they are a none profit group) is to write software, particularly stabile operating systems it certainly doesn’t reflect postively on them to have their website go down on the day of release.

Ok..enough with the griping.

Full Story.


Also:

FC6 was officially released. Even my preferred Belgian FTP mirror is serving it (but I am not going to download it now).

The rather unfortunate happening is the "known issue with various .redhat.com URLs and fedoraproject.org":

And the worse of all: a so-called sample of American humor, which I rather consider to be a sign of a teen-like immaturity: the release announcement!

That Post.

Fedora Core 6 (Part 1): Hardened but not Hard to Swallow

The step to Core 6 is smaller than the step to Core 5 last spring, and the distinguishing qualities of this release are generally those of refinement and polish.

Fedora Core is one of the few Linux distributions that is hardened out-of-the-box: SELinux uses the Linux Security Module (LSM) interface to enforce system-wide policy that restricts the actions of individual processes.

SELinux works well, but since applications are not aware that SELinux is restricting them, error messages can be a bit bewildering.

Full Post.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Re: Hardened but not Hard to Swallow

srlinuxx wrote:
SELinux works well, but since applications are not aware that SELinux is restricting them, error messages can be a bit bewildering.

I'll agree to that! I had to buy that book: "SELinux by Example: Using Security Enhanced Linux" to get a really good idea of how to handle things.

Once you get over the initial learning curve, its good...Its just "getting over the hurdle" is the hard part! Big Grin

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