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Devices: Gonimo, Building an ARM64 Laptop, and More

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Linux
Hardware
  • How to create a free baby monitoring system with Gonimo

    New and expecting parents quickly learn that there is a long—and expensive—list of equipment that a new baby needs. High on that list is a baby monitor, so they can keep an eye (and an ear) on their infant while they're doing other things. But this is one piece of equipment that doesn't have to eat into your baby fund; Gonimo is a free and open source solution that turns existing devices into a baby monitoring system, freeing up some of your baby budget for any of the thousands of other must-have or trendy items lining the aisles of the nearby big-box baby store.

    [...]

    If you know Haskell or want to learn it, you can check out our code at GitHub. Pull requests, code reviews, and issues are all welcome.

    And, finally, please help by spreading the word to new parents and the open source world that the Gonimo baby monitor is simple to use and already in your pocket.

  • Building an ARM64 laptop

    Processors based on the 64-bit ARM architecture have been finding their way into various types of systems, including mobile handsets and servers. There is a distinct gap in the middle of the range, though: there are no ARM64 laptops. Bernhard Rosenkränzer and a group of colleagues set out to change that situation by building such a laptop from available components. He showed up at the 2017 Open Source Summit North America to present the result.

    He started by addressing the question of why one would want to build an ARM64 laptop in the first place. The ARM architecture is known for low power use — a useful feature in a laptop in its own right — but there is more to the ARM story than that; the ARM64 chips are fast and can beat single-core Intel Core-M processors on some benchmarks. An ARM64 laptop may not be good for fast kernel builds, but it can do what most people need, and it can do the kernel builds too in the end. ARM processors need no fans, meaning that the resulting laptop is lighter and will not burn the user's legs. There is little or no malware targeting ARM64 systems, for now at least.

  • Fanless, rugged box-PC runs Linux on Kaby Lake

    Axiomtek’s rugged “eBOX700-891-FL” computer runs Linux or Win 10 IoT on Intel 7th Gen Core chips, and features 4x GbE, 6x USB, 2x mini-PCIe, and PCI x4.

  • 5.25-inch Apollo Lake SBC has up to 4x GbE ports
  • World’s first ESP32 industrial computer has extensive wireless options

    Techbase unveiled a “Moduino” automation controller with an ESP32-WROVER module plus WiFi, BT, and optional LoRa, Sigfox, LTE, Ethernet, and battery power.

    Polish embedded firm Techbase was one of the first manufacturers to tap the original Raspberry Pi Compute Module in 2014 with its ModBerry 500 automation controller, and has since updated it to an RPi Compute Module 3 based ModBerry 500 M3. Now, it is introducing the Moduino, which it calls the world’s first ESP32-based industrial computer.

  • Open Source USB-Key-Fob Allows Makers to Add the Peripherals They Need

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Debian and Derivatives: SnowCamp, Debian Gitlab, Debian/TeX Live, Snap Apps

  • Report from Debian SnowCamp: day 3
    Thanks to Valhalla and other members of LIFO, a bunch of fine Debian folks have convened in Laveno, on the shores of Lake Maggiore, for a nice weekend of relaxing and sprinting on various topics, a SnowCamp.
  • Report from SnowCamp #1
    As Nicolas already reported, a bunch of Debian folk gathered in the North of Italy for a long weekend of work and socialisation.
  • Debian Gitlab (salsa.debian.org) tricks
  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180225-1
    To my big surprise, the big rework didn’t create any havoc at all, not one bug report regarding the change. That is good. OTOH, I took some time off due to various surprising (and sometimes disturbing) things that have happened in the last month, so the next release took a bit longer than expected.
  • Ubuntu Software Will Soon Let You Install Beta, Bleeding Edge Snap Apps
    No, not TV channels, or the sort the that ferries goods between countries, but development channels, e.g, beta, bleeding edge, stable, etc. Snap developers are able to distribute different versions of their app over “channels”, and have for almost as long as Snappy has been around in fact.