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Software: GNU, GNOME, Synapse, and KDE's Amarok

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GNU
KDE
GNOME
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Videos Posted

    Videos from the recent GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 are now available online where matters from the GCC compiler to glibc and compiler diagnostics were discussed.

    The GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 took place from 8 to 10 September in Prague. Videos from the event are now online while the slides are sadly not yet available, but are said to be coming soon

  • GNUHealth 3.2.4 patchset released

    GNU Health 3.2.4 patchset has been released !

  • First GNOME 3.26 Point Release Now Rolling Out

    The first point release update to GNOME 3.26 is pretty much out (save for an official announcement). The first of many such releases, GNOME 3.26.1 brings with it bug fixes, performance tuning, and a few other minor tweaks.

  • Synapse – A Semantic Launcher for Searching and Launching Apps and Files

    Synapse is a free and open source quick launcher application with which you can easily start applications and access files using the Zeitgeist engine – kinda reminiscent of Ulauncher and Gnome Pie.

  • KDE's Amarok Music Player Seeing A Possible KF5/Qt5 Port

    It has been several years since last seeing an update to the Amarok open-source music player, but it looks like it may be alive and ticking after all, at least with one developer working towards a KF5/Qt5 port.

    Amarok is among the many KDE/Qt aligned media players from Juk, Cantata, Babe, Elisa, and others, but Amarok really hasn't been updated in quite a while. A Phoronix reader pointed out that a developer is indeed working on a port to using KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5 and posted some initial patches back in September.

More in Tux Machines

Cinnamon 4.0 Will Tackle Screen Tearing on Linux Mint

Linux Mint plans to make more performance improvements to the Cinnamon desktop ahead of its next release. Similar work featured as part of Cinnamon 3.8, released as part of Linux Mint 19, and improved the responsiveness of launching apps on the desktop. For the next major release of the Cinnamon desktop environment, the team want to tackle another performance-related bugbear: screen tearing. “On modern NVIDIA GPUs we’re able to get rid of screen tearing by using “Force Composition Pipeline” in NVIDIA-Settings. With Vsync disabled in Cinnamon we then enjoy a faster desktop environments with no screen tearing,“, writes Cinnamon’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre in a recent blog post. Read more

4 open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop

Ah, so many file formats—especially audio and video ones—can make for fun times if you get a file with an extension you don't recognize, if your media player doesn't play a file in that format, or if you want to use an open format. So, what can a Linux user do? Turn to one of the many open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop, of course. Let's take a look at four of them. Read more

Android Leftovers

Launching Open Source Initiatives Is the Next Battleground In Quantum Computing

At a time when tech giants are ploughing millions of dollars in quantum computing and are striving ahead with breakthroughs, Google, Microsoft and IBM seem to be locked in an intense battle of quantum supremacy. Mountain View search giant announced Cirq — an open-source framework for NISQ computers. Cirq is an open-source initiative that allows developers to create algorithms that can run on a number of machines without having a full background in quantum physics. The Google blog notes that once installed — Cirq enables researchers to write quantum algorithms for specific quantum processors. “Cirq gives users fine-tuned control over quantum circuits, specifying gate behaviour using native gates, placing these gates appropriately on the device, and scheduling the timing of these gates within the constraints of the quantum hardware,” the blog notes. Cirq supports running these algorithms locally on a simulator and is designed to easily integrate with future quantum hardware or larger simulators via the cloud. Read more