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today's leftovers

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  • Containers and Microservices Spark a Search for Better File Systems

    File systems usually stay low, both at the operating system level and in tech discussions. Red Hat’s recent deprecation of the Btrfs file system from its platform ignited some interest in the role of file systems in containerized environments.

    As Linux distributions container-based operations microservices, they come across new file-system related challenges. Linux vendors, including Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical, are major players in the container space. In addition to their traditional OSes, these companies have also built container as service platforms to handle containerized workloads and microservices. Following the footsteps of CoreOS’s Container Linux, Red Hat has created Project Atomic; Canonical came out with Ubuntu Core and SUSE released SUSE CaaS Platform and Kubic.

  • Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service
  • SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

    SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

  • F/LOSS (in)activity, September 2017

    Unfortunately, September was a poor month for me in terms of motivation and energy for F/LOSS work. I did some amount of Gitano work, merging a patch from Richard Ipsum for help text of the config command. I also submitted another patch to the STM32F103xx Rust repository, though it wasn't a particularly big thing. Otherwise I've been relatively quiet on the Rust/USB stuff and have otherwise kept away from projects.

More in Tux Machines

Software: GTK-VNC, GNOME Shell and More

Devices: Mintbox Mini, NanoNote (Part 3), MV3

  • Mintbox Mini 2: Compact Linux desktop with Apollo Lake quad-core CPU
    The Mintbox Mini 2 is a fanless computer that measures 4.4″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″ and weighs about 12 ounces. It’s powered by a 10W Intel Celeron J3455 quad-core processor.
  • Linux Mint ditches AMD for Intel with new Mintbox Mini 2
    While replacing Windows 10 with a Linux-based operating system is a fairly easy exercise, it shouldn’t be necessary. Look, if you want a computer running Linux, you should be able to buy that. Thankfully you can, as companies like System76 and Dell sell laptops and desktops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based operating systems. Another option? Buy a Mintbox! This is a diminutive desktop running Linux Mint — an Ubuntu-based OS. Today, the newest such variant — The Mintbox Mini 2 — makes an appearance. While the new model has several new aspects, the most significant is that the Linux Mint Team has switched from AMD to Intel (the original Mini used an A4-Micro 6400T).
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 3)
    So, we find ourselves in a situation where the compiler is doing the right thing for the code it is generating, but it also notices when the programmer has chosen to do what is now the wrong thing. We must therefore track down these instructions and offer a supported alternative. Previously, we introduced a special configuration setting that might be used to indicate to the compiler when to choose these alternative sequences of instructions: CPU_MIPS32_R1. This gets expanded to CONFIG_CPU_MIPS32_R1 by the build system and it is this identifier that gets used in the program code.
  • Linux Software Enables Advanced Functions on Controllers
    At NPE2018, SISE presents its new generation of multi-zone controllers (MV3). Soon, these controllers will be able to control as many as 336 zones. They are available in five sizes (XS, S, M, L and XL) with three available power cards (2.5 A, 15 A and 30 A). They are adaptable to the packaging, automotive, cosmetics, medical and technical-parts markets.

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Openwashing,, OCP, Kernel Commits Statistics

  • More Tips for Managing a Fast-Growing Open Source Project [Ed: Microsoft has infiltrated the Linux Foundation so deeply and severely that the Foundation now regularly issues openwashing pieces for the company that attacks Linux]
  • improves Kubernetes networking in sixth software release, one of Linux Foundation’s open source projects, has introduced its 18.01 software release with a focus on improving Kubernetes Networking, Istio and cloud native NFV.
  • Bolsters Kubernetes, NFV, and Istio Support With Latest Release
    The Fast Data Project ( released its sixth update since its inception within the Linux Foundation two years ago. While the update list is extensive, most are focused on Kubernetes networking, cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), and Istio.
  • Linux Foundation, OCP collaborate on open sourcing hardware and software
    The virtualization of network functions has resulted in a disaggregation of hardware and software, increasing interest in open source projects for both layers in return. To feed this interest, the Linux Foundation and Open Compute Project (OCP) recently announced a joint initiative to advance the development of software and hardware-based open source networking. Both organizations have something to offer the other through the collaboration. The Linux Foundation’s OPNFV project integrates OCP as well as other open source software projects into relevant network functions virtualization (NFV) reference architectures. At the same time, OCP offers an open source option for the hardware layer.
  • Kernel Commits with "Fixes" tag
    Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of kernel bug fix commits that use the "Fixes" tag.  Kernel developers use this annotation on a commit to reference an older commit that originally introduced the bug, which is obviously very useful for bug tracking purposes. What is interesting is that there has been a steady take-up of developers using this annotation:

today's howtos