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Matt Asay: Attribution - Full-blooded open source

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OSS

Ah, back to the delightsome days of accusations of mudblood open source. The newest whipping boy? Attribution clauses.

Who uses attribution? Several of the most promising open source companies...as well as the European Union (EUPL). They seem to like open source, as does the Creative Commons (which also uses attribution as a core licensing element). Oh, and so does Mozilla, which is in a tussle with Debian about improper use of its trademarks. (See, you have to police trademarks if you want to keep them and, no, trademarks are not from Satan.)

So, attribution is actually fairly common in open source. You might not know this, but the OSI approved attribution licenses way back when (e.g., Attribution Assurance License, as well as the original BSD license). And even recently (CDDL). But they're not in vogue now with "the community," I guess.

Here's why they should be:

Full Story.

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