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Linux Foundation Messages to the Media

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces 27 Recipients of LiFT Scholarships

    OPEN SOURCE SUMMIT EUROPE -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has announced the recipients of its 2017 Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Scholarships. LiFT provides advanced open source training to existing and aspiring IT professionals from around the world.

    This is the seventh year The Linux Foundation has awarded training scholarships. Seventy-five scholarships worth more than $168,000 have been awarded to date to current and aspiring IT professionals who may not otherwise be able to afford specialized training. Scholarship recipients receive a Linux Foundation training course and certification exam at no cost.

  • Two new open-source security projects are joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    The organization at the heart of modern open-source cloud-computing standards has taken another two projects under its umbrella, tackling container security for the first time.

  • The Cloud Native Computing Foundation adds two security projects to its open source stable

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is probably best known for being the home of the Kubernetes container orchestration project, but there plenty of other projects that now fall under the organization’s umbrella. All of them focus on bringing the kind of modern cloud-native tooling that companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook and others take for granted to a wider range of users.

    Today, the CNCF is expanding its stable with the addition of the Docker-incubated Notary and The Update Framework (TUF), which was originally developed by professor Justin Cappos and his team at NYU’s Tandon School of engineering. These are actually related projects. Notary, which can provide a layer of trust to any content, is actually an implementation of the TUF.

  • Linux Foundation Debuts Community Data License Agreement

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) family of open data agreements. In an era of expansive and often underused data, the CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing “open” data.

  • Linux Foundation creates a framework for sharing open data

    The Linux Foundation wants to open up the use of data in much the same way it has helped make open-source software a technology force to be reckoned with.

More in Tux Machines

Older Broadwell Graphics Performance Is Looking Good With The New Intel Gallium3D OpenGL Linux Driver

A majority of our benchmarking of Intel's new Gallium3D OpenGL open-source driver is done with various "Gen9" graphics hardware given its proliferation and not yet having any Icelake Gen11 graphics hardware for Linux benchmarking. But with the Iris Gallium3D going back to supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics, here is a fresh look at how that oldest supported Intel hardware is working for this new Linux open-source OpenGL driver compared to the current default "i965" Intel OpenGL driver too. Last week I provided an extensive look at the current Intel Gallium3D driver performance with the common Gen9 graphics hardware and the performance (and overall stability) of this new driver is looking great. It's looking like Intel is still on track for enabling that driver by default in Mesa before the 19.3 release at the end of the calendar year. Following that testing I was curious about Broadwell so I fired up an old Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop. Read more

Parrot 4.7 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Linux Kernel 5.2, MATE 1.22 Desktop

Coming more than four months after version 4.6, the Parrot 4.7 release is here with up-to-date penetration testing and ethical hacking tools for security researchers and everyone else how wants to get started with security releated tasks. Powered by the Linux 5.2 kernel, Parrot 4.7 introduces a new sandbox behavior to make it easier to use sandboxed apps. "In Parrot 4.7 the sandbox is disabled by default, and users can decide wether to start an application sandboxed or not," explains Lorenzo Faletra. "You can easily start the sandboxed version of an installed program from the /sandbox/ folder or from a dedicated menu that we plan to improve in the future, or you can re-enable it by default by using the firecfg tool." Read more

Linux Kernel 5.3 Gets First Point Release, It's Now Ready for Mass Deployments

Released by Linus Torvalds on September 15th, Linux kernel 5.3 is the latest and most advanced kernel series for Linux-based operating systems and introduces support for the Intel Speed Select feature to make power tuning much easier on some Xeon servers, as well as support for AMD Radeon Navi GPUs in the AMDGPU driver. It also adds support for Zhaoxin x86 CPUs, support for utilizing the clamping mechanism in power-asymmetric processors, support for the umwait x86 instructions for more power efficient userspace, support for 16 millions new IPv4 addresses in the 0.0.0.0/8 range, and support for the lightweight and flexible ACRN embedded hypervisor. Read more Also: Collabora Adds MPEG-2 Decoding to the Linux 5.3 Kernel, Many Other Changes

Lubuntu, A Once Great Distro, Is Falling Behind

Lubuntu used to be that Linux distribution that you referred a friend to in case he wanted a very lightweight, newbie-friendly yet elegant alternative for Windows. Up to its 18.04LTS release, it indeed worked as expected, but starting with 18.10 where the development team switched to using the Qt-based desktop LXQt instead of traditional LXDE, things started to break. As a short background, you should know that there was a desktop environment called “Razor-Qt”, which was a newly developed desktop based on the Qt toolkit that aimed to be lightweight and modern in the same time. There was also another team working on a Qt branch of LXDE (which is GTK-based) called LXDE-Qt. After a lot of discussions, both teams combined efforts and started to work on one project called LXQt. LXDE desktop is still working today, and is considered to be feature complete. But it was not even ported to GTK 3 like other desktops such as MATE and XFCE, instead, it’s still using the legacy GTK 2. Read more