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Linux Foundation Messages to the Media

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces 27 Recipients of LiFT Scholarships

    OPEN SOURCE SUMMIT EUROPE -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has announced the recipients of its 2017 Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Scholarships. LiFT provides advanced open source training to existing and aspiring IT professionals from around the world.

    This is the seventh year The Linux Foundation has awarded training scholarships. Seventy-five scholarships worth more than $168,000 have been awarded to date to current and aspiring IT professionals who may not otherwise be able to afford specialized training. Scholarship recipients receive a Linux Foundation training course and certification exam at no cost.

  • Two new open-source security projects are joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    The organization at the heart of modern open-source cloud-computing standards has taken another two projects under its umbrella, tackling container security for the first time.

  • The Cloud Native Computing Foundation adds two security projects to its open source stable

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is probably best known for being the home of the Kubernetes container orchestration project, but there plenty of other projects that now fall under the organization’s umbrella. All of them focus on bringing the kind of modern cloud-native tooling that companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook and others take for granted to a wider range of users.

    Today, the CNCF is expanding its stable with the addition of the Docker-incubated Notary and The Update Framework (TUF), which was originally developed by professor Justin Cappos and his team at NYU’s Tandon School of engineering. These are actually related projects. Notary, which can provide a layer of trust to any content, is actually an implementation of the TUF.

  • Linux Foundation Debuts Community Data License Agreement

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) family of open data agreements. In an era of expansive and often underused data, the CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing “open” data.

  • Linux Foundation creates a framework for sharing open data

    The Linux Foundation wants to open up the use of data in much the same way it has helped make open-source software a technology force to be reckoned with.

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Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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