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VAR-SOM-MX7 is now available with Certified 802.11ac/a/b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 support

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Linux

Variscite has announced the upgrade of its popular VAR-SOM-MX7 module to the BT/BLE 4.2 version. The upgrade, applied to all the different variants of the product, features higher speed and improved security. This innovative technology has a significant and direct impact on IoT devices, in particular on those with critical requirements for privacy.

In addition, the company has announced the expansion of the VAR-SOM-MX7 product line, launching a new variant with the latest generation of Wi-Fi standards. This upgrade comes shortly after the implementation of similar features on another popular company module, the DART-6UL.

The newly introduced VAR-SOM-MX7-5G variant is enhanced with fully certified Wi-Fi/BT module and carries 802.11ac/a/b/g/n dual band 2.4/5 GHz support. This variant provides improved performance and effective bit-rate. An ideal solution for devices requiring high data transfer rates over the wireless network or simultaneous connections.

The company will continue to provide the successful Initial VAR-SOM-MX7 variant in parallel with the new VAR-SOM-MX7-5G variant power by NXP i.MX7 1GHz dual-core Cortex-A7 processor. All the while keeping a very attractive price range - starting from 35 USD.

The VAR-SOM-MX7-5G and the VAR-SOM-MX7 are pin-to-pin compatible, sharing the exact same interfaces and features-set. They support industrial temperature grade and include real-time 200MHz ARM Cortex-M4 co-processor, with longevity commitment until 2025.

Variscite provides fully production-ready software suits for the VAR-SOM-MX7 and VAR-SOM-MX7-5G, based on the leading platforms in the market including Linux Yocto, Debian, and FreeRTOS. The aim: To deliver an end-to-end solution that will shorten and facilitate development time and efforts.

Availability and pricing:
The VAR-SOM-MX7 System on Module and associate development kits are available now for orders in production quantities, starting from 35 USD per unit.

VAR-SOM-MX7-5G key features include:
• Certified Wi-Fi 802.11ac/b/g/n & Bluetooth 4.2/BLE
• Cortex-A7 NXP iMX7 dual 1000MHz
• Real-time Cortex-M4 200MHz co-processor
• Up to 32 GB eMMC / 512 MB NAND and 2048 MB DDR3L
• Touchscreen controller
• Dual gigabit Ethernet with integrated PHY
• Display: 24-bit parallel RGB up to WXGA, MIPI DSI, EPD
• Dual USB 2.0 (OTG/ Host), PCIe
• Camera input: Parallel, CSI
• Digital/analog audio in/out
• 32-bit parallel external local bus
• Dual CAN, SPI, PWM, ADC, UART, I2C, SD/MMC

About Variscite:
Variscite is a leading System on Modules (SoM) and Single-Board-Computer (SBC) design and manufacture company. A trusted provider of development and production services for a variety of embedded platforms, Variscite transforms clients' visions into successful products.

Visit Variscite's website: http://www.variscite.com
Email sales@variscite.com or call +972 9 9562910 for more information

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