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KDE: Plasma Mobile and Qt Quick Controls

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KDE
  • How to emulate Plasma Mobile on your machine with qemu

    If you want to develop for Plasma Mobile, but you don’t have a Mobile device, it is useful to emulate a Plasma Mobile on your desktop or laptop. Earlier this was not documented and has been asked multiple times on how to achieve this.

    This blog post is intended to help install a Plasma Mobile on the qemu-x86.

  • Qt Quick Controls 2: Imagine Style

    Back in April we wrote about image-based styling for Qt Quick Controls 2. Since then, we have made good progress and nailed down some aspects that were still under consideration. We call the new style “Imagine”.

  • Are you ready for Qt Quick Controls 2.3?

    This blog post takes a brief look at some of the new features in Qt Quick Controls 2.3 released as part of Qt 5.10. See also New Features in Qt 5.10 for a more detailed list.

More on Qt Quick and "Big thanks to KDE!"

  • Say hello to Qt Quick Pointer Handlers

    We’ve known for several years that our multi-touch support in Qt Quick has been inadequate for many use cases. We have PinchArea, to handle two-finger scaling, rotation and dragging; and MultiPointTouchArea, which can at least be used to show some sort of interactive feedback for the touchpoints, or maybe you could write a little state machine in JavaScript to recognize some kind of gesture. As for the rest of Qt Quick though, the main problems are 1) support for mouse events came first; 2) Qt assumes there is only one mouse (the “core pointer”); 3) QMouseEvent and QTouchEvent (and a few more) have no suitable intermediate base class, so they end up being delivered independently; 4) that being hard, shortcuts were taken early on, to treat touch events as mouse events and deliver them the same way. So the result is that you cannot interact with two MouseAreas or Flickables at the same time, for example. This means you cannot press two Buttons at the same time, or drag two Sliders at the same time, if they are implemented with MouseArea.

    At first I hoped to fix that by making MouseArea and Flickable both handle touch events separately. The patches to do that were quite complex, adding a lot of duplicated logic for the full parallel delivery path: a QMouseEvent would take one path and a QTouchEvent would take another, in the hope that the interaction would work as much the same as possible. It was months of work, and at the end it mostly worked… but it was hard to keep all the existing autotests passing, and colleagues worried about it being a behavior change. MouseArea proclaims by its name that it handles mouse events, so as soon as it begins to handle touch events separately, it becomes a misnomer. Suddenly you would be able to press two Buttons or Tabs or Radio Buttons at the same time, in applications and sets of controls which weren’t designed for it. (So we tried adding a bool property to opt in, but needing to set that in every MouseArea would be ugly.) MouseArea and Flickable also need to cooperate a lot, so the changes would have to be done together to keep everything working. It was possible, but narrowly missed shipping in Qt 5.5 due to uncertainty.

  • Big thanks to KDE!

    It has been over a week now that I attended Grace Hopper Celebration India 2017 in Bangalore from 16-17 November, yet the excitement still flows in me! I attended GHCI 2017 as a KDE Developer and student attendee. Big thanks to KDE Community for funding me!

    The Grace Hopper Celebration India (GHCI) is the largest and most influential event for women pursuing technical careers in computing and technology in the country. The conference was held at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre(BIEC), a premier exhibition center in Bangalore. The place was vibrant and energetic with close to 2000+ attendees.

    The conference began early morning around 7:30 with registrations. There was a warm welcome and a presentation session followed by keynote session by Pankajam Sridevi, MD at ANZ Bengaluru. Even on the second day, the event started early and there was a keynote by Dr. Rebecca Parsons, CTO at ThoughtWorks. Both the days, the event continued till evening till 5 pm with many interesting tracks based on Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Open Source, Machine Learning and several speed-mentoring sessions.

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