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KDE and Distributions: MEPIS Interview

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Interviews

The MEPIS distribution has been one of the bigger KDE-centric distributions around for some years now, created to make desktop GNU/Linux easier to use. As part of our KDE and Distributions series founder and main contributor Warren Woodford talks to KDE Dot News about the history and current vision of the distribution.

Past

Can you tell us about the history of your distribution?

I started MEPIS in November 2002 because I wasn't satisfied with the distros I had used. I've been working with GUIs since 1984 and I know what I like and expect from an OS and a desktop. Trolltech had the tools and KDE had the desktop but, in my opinion, everyone was missing the mark when putting it all together to create a user experience. So I decided to do MEPIS. I didn't know if anyone would like the results, including me.

Why did you choose KDE and which version of KDE did you first implement?

Full Interview.

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