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Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Make Firefox Quantum look native in Fedora 27

    Client side decoration allows the application to use its own decorations. Traditionally the window manager is in charge of providing the title bar, close button, border, re-size grips, and so on. These graphical elements are called decorations. With client side decoration, an application can tell the window manager, “No thank you, I don’t want decorations.”

  • Red Hat Plans To Deploy Next-Gen Stratis Storage For Fedora 28

    Stratis is still at a pre-1.0 development stage and isn't expected to be feature complete at least well into 2018, but the hope is getting it early in Fedora will help mature it faster and see its community interest and adoption.

    More details on the Stratis Storage proposal for Fedora 28 can be found on the Fedora Wiki. More details on the Stratis project itself can be found via GitHub.

  • It’s time to modernize: Your UNIX alternative with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Microsoft Azure

    A large Red Hat customer transitioned from a high-end RISC server to Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and was able to recoup the cost of the project in just over three months. This is without factoring in real estate, depreciation of hardware, and power/cooling. In parallel, they were able to decrease their risk profile: according to one of Red Hat’s chief technologists who has advised many customers on their Linux migration strategy, spares for some RISC vendors have become increasingly difficult to acquire. Some customers readily admit that online auctions have become their primary source for spares. This is troubling on many levels. Factor in the price/performance ratio of RISC vs. x86 and the choice to migrate can become even more appealing.

  • Recent Institutional Activity: New York REIT, Inc. (NYRT), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Project Future Performance Before Investment – Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: ROCm, AMD, Mesa, Sway

  • ROCm 1.8.2 Released For The Open-Source Radeon Linux Compute Stack
    While waiting for the big ROCm 1.9 update, another point release to the ROCm 1.8 series is available for this Radeon Open Compute stack. Earlier this month the AMD developers working on this Linux open-source OpenCL/compute stack pushed out the ROCm 1.8.2 beta while today it was elevated to the stable channel. Details on the ROCm 1.8.2 update are unfortunately light, but based upon user reports, it seems to be able to create a working environment on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS if paired with a newer kernel. But the official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS isn't coming until ROCm 1.9.
  • Raven Ridge APUs Get Minor Performance Boost With Latest RADV Vulkan Driver
    The Raven Ridge Linux support continues to maturing. The latest on these Zen+Vega APUs using the open-source AMD Radeon Linux graphics driver stack should be slightly better performance when using the RADV Vulkan driver. RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen landed a number of commits on Wednesday to further enhance this Mesa-based Radeon Vulkan driver. With this latest work, he's now enabled binning and DFSM by default for Raven Ridge hardware. With this being enabled now for Raven, he's found a minor performance in the range of 2~3% for some demos and games tested.
  • Freedreno Gallium3D Now Exposes Adreno A5xx Performance Counters
    It's been a while since last having any news to report on Freedrenon, the open-source, community-driven Gallium3D driver for providing accelerated 3D support for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware. But ahead of the upcoming Mesa 18.2 feature freeze, Freedreno founder Rob Clark has been landing a number of improvements.
  • Sway 1.0 Alpha 4 Released With Real-Time Video Capture, Atomic Layout Updates
    Learn more about the Sway 1.0 Alpha 4 release via the GitHub release announcement.

Kdenlive 18.08 Beta – Film Noir

Kdenlive is my video editor de jour since the dawn of civilization, or rather, as far back as my video editing attempts go. Pretty much all of the clips I uploaded to my Youtube channel were made using Kdenlive, with only some extra work in other programs. Kdenlive is powerful, flexible, useful, and now there’s a new beta that promises many good things and delights. The 18.08 version can be found under the label Refactoring Branch – sounds like an avantguard field of mathematics – and it is distributed as a self-contained AppImage, meaning you just need to make the file executable and then run it (single- or double-click). Which is exactly what I did. Follow me. Read more

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