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Simple Way to Update Ubuntu Edgy With Slow/No Internet Connection

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HowTos

One of the biggest hurdles for the already popular distribution Ubuntu in gaining still more popularity all across the world, is the limited number of applications shipped as part of the distribution media. Where most of the distributions provide users with the option of downloading a number of CD/DVDs(Fedora, SUSE, Debian) at one time, Ubuntu follows the philosophy of keeping things simple by offering only 1 CD/DVD worth of software, that includes one popular application per task(one web browser, one text editor, one media player etc), allowing users to download and install additional applications whenever needed from the Internet repositories. Though I personally like this philosophy very much(which is also one of the reasons why I like GNOME more than KDE), this works well only for those users who either don’t require anything more than the installed default applications or those who have a fast Internet connection to download the necessary additional applications. The users with slow/no Internet connection are left wanting in this kind of setup as it is almost impossible to conveniently add more applications to Ubuntu without decent Internet connectivity. This is the primary reason why many of my friends go for the distributions like Fedora or SUSE, or even Debian, rather than Ubuntu or Gentoo, even if they like the latter distributions more.

Below is an example of how to install an application on Ubuntu by using the Internet connection of a second machine.

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