Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Is PCLINUXOS a debian distro or another type?

Filed under
PCLinuxOS

Is Codeweavers Cross Office program compatible with PCLINUXOS? I tried to install the beta version earlier today and it would not install. It uses a .sh extension. When I double clicked on the direct download from Codeweavers and I tried to install it, it said it was corrupt. And each subsequent download has said the same. Is it that it is not compatible with PCLINUXOS or is something else the issue.

Also, out of curiousity, are there big differences between PCLINUXOS, Dream Linux and MEPIS?
I have downloaded and used all three, and since they PCLINUX and MEPIS are both KDE based and Dream Linux is XOFC based, aside from the desktop interfaces, I did not see a big difference between them. They are all very stable, and very fast once downloaded and installed on to my local computer. By the Way, Codeweaver installed without a hitch into DreamLinux.

Thanks and regards.

Installing outside repos

Just another point of view, having used PCLinuxOS for over two years and one that likes to do what I want with my own computer, I tend to install software from across the net if I cannot find it in the repositories on PCLinuxOS.

In saying that, I believe most distro's tell you not to do that because if you get into borking the system they cannot help you because you may have changed something in the OS that they may not be aware of when you download out side of the repositories.

PCLinuxOS is a great Distro, and I have never had a problem by doing what I do, but if you do as I have your own data backed up and prepared to do a re-install of your system, as it is would not by fair to the support forums to ask how to fix something, if you are outside of the main repos.

Rodney

Member of Linux Geeks United
Linux Reg. #403050

crashes on K3b - to Walter

As I have also tried the K3b (however on Mandriva) I just assume that your problem is that you tried to burn
a disk with more than 80 min. of sound.

NOTE : If this is a music CD it must be under 80 min. otherwise the program will not
handle it.
For over 80 min. use Nautilus - it works perfect , if you have it.

Success!

Yes you can, but not many

Livecd needs 512 mb of drams and can not add programs.

Yes, you can install programs; not many, though. It uses a ramdisk that overlays the CD's read-only filesystem, but it's pretty small (depending on the amount of memory you have, of course). For example, I had just enough room to install the nvidia kernel modules to get Beryl working from the live CD. (This is why having a "persistent disk image" option would be nice.)

The live CD also ran adequately on a laptop with only 256MB of RAM (it did find and use the pre-existing swap partition, though).

The magic is fading

It had to happen, I suppose, especially when all efforts are going in to the new version. I'm having problems I can't fix and am going to develop an alternative.

~

You'll be back as soon as the stable version is released. It is simply the the best distro. I don't stop looking around either but I know it's PCLinuxOS for me - because it works ... and the community is A!

Registered Linux User No. 401868

~

archie wrote:
it's PCLinuxOS for me - because it works

Hi, archie. The trouble is it isn't working. I'll still try the new version, though.

K3b cd burner / PClinuxOS

I am new to linux and had a dual boot w/winXP Home & PClinuxOS.94 and very much enjoyed this linux OS.

Just a few days ago I upgraded to the PCLOS-2007 test release (which i think is the most beautiful and best linux distro i have seen so far)and everything worked wonderful except when I tried (K3b) to burn a CD ....it crashes.

I tried removing the program then re-installing it ....it helped a little, but again crashed just before i started the burn.

I'm wondering if anyone else is experiencing this problem or maybe i'm doing something wrong???

walter l jones

re: K3b cd burner / PClinuxOS

There were a few reports on the test 1 forum discussion and a coupla suggestions.

Crashes on PCLOS

I've been able to use K3b without any crashing but I've had other applications crashing.

Try posting on the forum and give details of exactly what you did. It may help to remove the k3b files and folders in .kde/share/config | apps

As for me, I'm going to develop my Vector installation further.

PCLOS is a MDK distribution

PCLOS is a MDK distribution there is a big difference in rpm packages and debian is a RPM based distro as far as that codeweavers i know that there is a mdk rpm and you will need kpackage to install it as far as PCLOS it is far more superior than any other distro out there i have used every single distro out there and when i came to PCLOS i stopped i have an older customer base and pclos keeps it simple so everyone can use it.

Mandriva & "package manager" - does not compute

malai5 wrote:
Mandriva ... does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install

There was I thinking I must have been the last person to discover that so many other distros have what Mandriva lacks, i.e. a decent package manager. But no, there is at least one yet to make the discovery.

I wonder whether there is anyone in the universe who thinks Mandriva has an intelligent marketing strategy or, indeed, any strategy? Anyone who thinks its numerous websites are informative and simple to navigate? Anyone who thinks it's set up to compete and prosper?

PC Linux

Hi All

Having tried many Linux distributions, the ones that are most user friendly are PC Linux and Mandriva "One" 2007.
However, Mandriva is only a small distribution compared to PC Linux, in that it has limited in house upgrades. BUT, it does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install. without reverting to the command line. That feature alone makes Mandriva "One" 2007, a shoo in for those crossing over from Windoze.

Apart from that, PC Linux is a very stable, feature packed and beautiful to look at, Linux OS, that I personally use. It just needs the RPM auto install and it would be as close to perfect an OS can be.

Cheers

Malai5

The Further You Go, The Less You Know.
www.mam3.com.au

CLI package install?

malai5 wrote:
Hi All
However, Mandriva is only a small distribution compared to PC Linux, in that it has limited in house upgrades. BUT, it does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install. without reverting to the command line. That feature alone makes Mandriva "One" 2007, a shoo in for those crossing over from Windoze.

Apart from that, PC Linux is a very stable, feature packed and beautiful to look at, Linux OS, that I personally use. It just needs the RPM auto install and it would be as close to perfect an OS can be.

Humm, better look again. PCLinuxOS comes with Synaptic already configured with our repositories. All you have to do is start Synaptic from the menu, click on the package you want to install, and click Apply. You never had to open a terminal to install an rpm from our repos.
Sal

Hi Sal That is correct, if

Hi Sal

That is correct, if the RPM package is in the repository, BUT, if it isn't then it's back to the command line.
As you know, RPM and TAR files are offered by NON "Free" source distributors to update their products that are in some linux distributions, Flash is one that springs to mind and was updated in Mandriva for Firefox. Another one was the VMware Beta 6.0 tools package that I needed.In Mandriva "One" 20et the07, it was automatic, in PClinux it was done through a terminal as root. No, not hard, once you get the hang of it, but a definate put off for the new emigrants from Windoze.

Think about it Sal, it would make PClinux just perfect.

Cheers

Malai5

The Further You Go, The Less You Know.
www.mam3.com.au

Broken packages and dependencies

We at the PCLinuxOS community have this much said warning to users wishing to install "outside" packages. Do it at your own risk. And in doing so there won't be support offered. The best deal is to make a software request in the forum, complete with links and what it's for, and if you get lucky, the devs would be quick on it.

There are literally a load of apps one can install from the PCLinuxOS repository.

Best regards

Registered Linux User No. 401868

It is no problem

to install Crossover Office on PCLinuxOS. You just have to follow the instructions on Codeweaver's website.

Did you install PCLinuxOS to your hard drive? If so, you should have seen the New User Guide icon on your desktop. Have you clicked that icon? It will take you to the new user's wiki site. The wiki site won't answer this specific question, but it will lead you to the PCLinuxOS support site, http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php .
Posting your question there will result in numerous replies to your question.

To specifically answer your question, a .sh file is used so that you can install the program on Linux, no matter what package manager it uses. It won't matter if it's Debian, RedHat, or Slackware, .deb-based, .rpm-based, or .tgz-based.

To install the software package you downloaded, open a terminal window. Change to the directory (cd) the downloaded file is in. Type chmod+x install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh. (I am assuming that is the name of the file you downloaded.) Then type sh install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh. The installation will begin.

You can't just double-click the file to install it. If you still don't understand, post your question on the forum @ http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php .

The following is an example of what you would type in the terminal window:

cd Downloads
chmod +x install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh
sh install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh

It's RPM based...

PCLinuxOS is an rpm-based distro unlike Debian or other Debian-based stuff. Maybe that's why CrossOffice has issues with it? I'm sorry, I've never used CrossOffice.

More in Tux Machines

Leaving Mozilla and Recalling One's Job in Mozilla

  • yoric.steps.next()

    The web is getting darker. It is being weaponized by trolls, bullies and bad actors and, as we’ve witnessed, this can have extremely grave consequences for individuals, groups, sometimes entire countries. So far, most of the counter-measures proposed by either governments or private actors are even scarier. The creators of the Matrix protocol have recently published the most promising plan I have seen. One that I believe stands a chance of making real headway in this fight, while respecting openness, decentralization, open-source and privacy. I have been offered the opportunity to work on this plan. For this reason, after 9 years as an employee at Mozilla, I’ll be moving to Element, where I’ll try and contribute to making the web a better place. My last day at Mozilla will be October 30th.

  • Working open source | daniel.haxx.se

    I work full time on open source and this is how. Background I started learning how to program in my teens, well over thirty years ago and I’ve worked as a software engineer and developer since the early 1990s. My first employment as a developer was in 1993. I’ve since worked for and with lots of companies and I’ve worked on a huge amount of (proprietary) software products and devices over many years. Meaning: I certainly didn’t start my life open source. I had to earn it. When I was 20 years old I did my (then mandatory) military service in Sweden. After having endured that, I applied to the university while at the same time I was offered a job at IBM. I hesitated, but took the job. I figured I could always go to university later – but life took other turns and I never did. I didn’t do a single day of university. I haven’t regretted it. [...]    I’d like to emphasize that I worked as a contract and consultant developer for many years (over 20!), primarily on proprietary software and custom solutions, before I managed to land myself a position where I could primarily write open source as part of my job. [...] My work setup with Mozilla made it possible for me to spend even more time on curl, apart from the (still going) two daily spare time hours. Nobody at Mozilla cared much about (my work with) curl and no one there even asked me about it. I worked on Firefox for a living. For anyone wanting to do open source as part of their work, getting a job at a company that already does a lot of open source is probably the best path forward. Even if that might not be easy either, and it might also mean that you would have to accept working on some open source projects that you might not yourself be completely sold on. In late 2018 I quit Mozilla, in part because I wanted to try to work with curl “for real” (and part other reasons that I’ll leave out here). curl was then already over twenty years old and was used more than ever before.

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps.  The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

  •   
  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause. Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

  •   
  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels.  This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers. Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills. Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average. [...] The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice