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Novell speaks on Microsoft deal

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Interviews

WE SPOKE to Novell European president Tom Francese in the wake of the Microsoft pact to get some reaction on the deal.

INQ: What’s your immediate reaction to the deal?

TF: I like Steve Ballmer's statement that people said this could never be done. From an open-source community point of view I would say: nothing can stop us now. The movement has been fully embraced by one of the last bastions, Microsoft. We can go to market with IBM, HP, Dell, but now that includes Microsoft.

INQ: Any reaction from users yet?

TF: We had calls throughout the night. I’m an out-in-the-field person and customers have been calling saying 'now we can select an open-source partner and if we select Suse Linux we are completely free and unencumbered by concerns on intellectual property'.

INQ: But previously open-source vendors have always argued that there is no major user concern on IP…

Full Story.

Year 2512. Microsoft Makes Windows OS Open Source. Apocalypse…

"Exactly 506 years ago, the former CEO of our galactic company Microsoft, decided to make the first step towards making our famous Windows OS a part of the open source movement. Thank you Steve Ballmer!"

This is how an opening speech at WinHEC 2512 will probably sound like, after today’s announcement about the Novell-Microsoft collaboration. I’m sure many Linux fans will cry in despair and will consider this alliance sort of a “union against nature”. Others (analysts in particular…) will become like scavengers and will dissect all possible implications of this partnership, from Linux’s point of view and from MS’s point of view. Boring…Why not imagine something else and try to squeeze some humor out?

We all know Microsoft has a long history of dominance in the tech world, although it has not obtained that dominance by always being revolutionary or innovative in its domain of activity. Actually, the tech illuminati might say it’s the other way around. And since history has a bad habit of repeating itself regularly, we can imagine that will happen in the future.
So how will things look like in the year 2512 for MS? Sit back and enjoy the history lesson told from the future…

Full Article.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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