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Ubuntu Desktop and Server

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  • Ubuntu 17.10 Breaks the BIOS on Some Lenovo Laptops

    If you get a Lenovo laptop for xmas and plan on installing Ubuntu 17.10 on it take my advice and don’t.

    You heard me: do not install Ubuntu.

    According to bug reports filed on Launchpad, the official Ubuntu bug tracker, installing Ubuntu 17.10 may inadvertently corrupt the BIOS on a raft of Lenovo laptops, including the Lenovo Yoga line.

    Which is seriously bad news.

    Those affected say that after installing Ubuntu 17.10 the BIOS on their device is no longer able to save settings (like changing boot order and device, which is often required when dual-booting), that settings reset after a reboot, some are not able to exit BIOS, while others are left unable boot from USB.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 19 Dec 2017

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

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  • Ubuntu 17.10 Corrupts the BIOS of Some Lenovo Laptops, Respin ISOs Coming Soon

    Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley informs us that many users are reporting corrupt BIOS on their Lenovo laptops when attempting to install the latest Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    The issue is causing the BIOS of several Lenovo laptops to no longer save new settings. Once you've installed Ubuntu 17.10 and you reboot the laptop, the system will start with the old BIOS settings. The cause appears to be related with the intel-spi-* drivers in the Linux kernel, which aren't ready for use.

    Lenovo B40-70, Lenovo B50-70, Lenovo B50-80, Lenovo Flex-10, Lenovo G40-30, Lenovo G50-70, Lenovo G50-80, Lenovo S20-30, Lenovo U31-70, Lenovo Y50-70, Lenovo Y70-70, Lenovo Yoga Thinkpad (20C0), Lenovo Yoga 2 11" - 20332, Lenovo Z50-70, Lenovo Z51-70, and Lenovo IdeaPad 100-15IBY are among the Lenovo laptops known to be affected by the issue. A Toshiba S50t-B laptop is also affected.

In Phoronix

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Temporarily Pulled Due To A BIOS Corrupting Problem

    Canonical has temporarily pulled the download links for Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" from the Ubuntu website due to ongoing reports of some laptops finding their BIOS corrupted after installing this latest Ubuntu release. The issue is appearing most frequently with Lenovo laptops but there are also reports of issues with other laptop vendors as well.

    This issue appears to stem from the Intel SPI driver in the 17.10's Linux 4.13 kernel corrupting the BIOS for a select number of laptop motherboards. Canonical is aware of this issue and is planning to disable the Intel SPI drivers in their kernel builds. Canonical's hardware enablement team has already verified this works around the problem, but doesn't provide any benefit if your BIOS is already corrupted.

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  • Canonical pulls Ubuntu 17.10 over UEFI corruption issue

    Canonical has pulled downloads for its Ubuntu 17.10 Linux distribution following reports that it can trigger a bug in the UEFI firmware of selected Lenovo, Acer, and Toshiba laptops, corrupting the BIOS and disabling the ability to boot from USB Drives.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 can brick some laptops

    Downloads of Ubuntu 17.10 have been disabled due to an issue that can cause it to corrupt the firmware on some laptops. Lenovo laptops appear to be the most affected, but the problem is apparently not limited to them. The intel-spi driver has been named as the source of the problem; it's not clear whether other distributions may also be affected. If you downloaded 17.10, you might want to hold off on installing it.

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