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GoboLinux Release 013 Screenshots

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Linux

Shipping on November 3 was GoboLinux 013. For those that are unfamiliar with this install and LiveCD distribution is that among its many differences, it breaks away from the historical UNIX directory hierarchy. It is also a distribution tagged as not needing a package manager because the filesystem is the package manager. New in GoboLinux 013 is X.Org 7.1, KDE 3.5.3, GCC 4.1.1, and the Linux 2.6.16 kernel.

Phoronix has some nice screenshots.

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    Psychotherapy centre's database [cracked], patient info held ransom
                     
                       

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