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KDE Plasma 5.11.5 Linux Desktop Environment Released as the Last in the Series

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KDE

Coming one and a half months after the KDE Plasma 5.11.4 release, KDE Plasma 5.11.5 is here with more than 30 bug fixes and improvements across various of its components, such as the KWin window and composite manager, KScreenlocker screen locker, Oxygen and Breeze themes, Plasma Discover package manager, as well as Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, and Plasma Addons.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.11.5. Plasma 5.11 was released in January with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience," reads today's announcement. "This release adds a three week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important."

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