Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Games: Valve, Humble, x86 Security Changes

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve responds to accusations of erroneous Steam cheating bans on Linux

    Valve has responded to accusations that it is automatically banning Linux Steam accounts simply for having certain phrases in their usernames, calling the claims "a tactic employed by cheaters to try and sow discord and distrust among anticheat systems".

    The reports first surfaced over the weekend, when some users took to Valve's github bug repositories claiming that Steam accounts on Linux featuring the phrase "catbot" were being banned by Valve's anti-cheating software.

    "Catbot" is a name associated with a type of nuisance, auto-aim cheat bot, often seen in the likes of Team Fortress 2. Reports suggested that all Linux accounts with "catbot" in their name were being blanket banned by Valve, regardless of whether cheating had occurred.

  • [Corrected] No, Valve Anti-Cheat is not banning Linux users for having "catbot" in their username

    Valve software engineer John McDonald made the statement on the associated Reddit story, and you can read it in full here. He says simply "the bug report is incorrect," and hypothesises that it and many other posts in the thread are an attempt to foment distrust of anticheat systems.

  • The 'Humble Staff Picks Bundle: Scribble' seems like a nice deal for Linux gamers

    If you're in the mood to pick up some cheap games the Humble Staff Picks Bundle: Scribble is now available and it has a few Linux games.

  • Linux Gaming Performance Doesn't Appear Affected By The x86 PTI Work

    With the recently published Initial Benchmarks Of The Performance Impact Resulting From Linux's x86 Security Changes, one of the common questions that came up is whether gaming performance is adversely affected by the x86 Page Table Isolation changes recently merged to the Linux kernel.

More in Tux Machines

Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Crowdfunding Campaign Ends with $2 Million

Librem 5 was successfully crowdfunded about two weeks ago when it surpassed its goal of $1.5 million, but the campaign continued to run, and now it appears to have gathered half million dollars more, ending with $2 million, which we believe is more than enough to build world's first truly free mobile device. Powered by PureOS, Purism's own GNU/Linux distribution based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system, but focused on offering users a privacy-focused and more secure desktop solution, Librem 5 will be using KDE's Plasma Mobile and GNOME's GNOME Shell user interfaces, along with powerful open source software. Read more

Linux Kernel: Linux 4.14.14, Linux 4.9.77, Linux 4.4.112 and Linux 3.18.92

also: Linux Kernels 4.14.14, 4.9.77, 4.4.112, and 3.18.92 Released with Security Fixes

Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE: Alberto Bullo

I started using Linux few years ago out of curiosity when my old computer started to get slow and wanted to try something lighter. At the time, I had a disk of Fedora lying around from a conference and managed to get it installed and working. Since then, I started using it for everyday tasks to get more familiar with the alternative software. I really liked the fact that I could select any distro I wanted and have full control of the operating system. I also used Linux for university projects and started to better understand how to use the utilities and services. Open source projects caught my attention when I started using them on my first job as they gave me the ability to adjust the features and code to my needs but also to contribute back to the community. I then started visiting open source conferences to get more involved and became a big fan of the initiative. Read more

RF-enabled Raspberry Pi add-on brings Google Assistant to gizmos, speakers, and robots

JOY-iT and Elector have launched a $42 “Talking Pi” RPi add-on that enables Google Home/AIY compatible voice activation of home automation devices linked to the Pi’s GPIO, and includes a mic board, PWM servo controls, and support for a 433MHz SRD radio. Elektor has begun selling a $42, open source voice control add-on board that is programmable via the Google Assistant SDK. Built by Germany based JOY-iT, and marketed by Conrad Business Supplies, the RF-enabled Talking Pi enables voice control of home automation equipment such as smart lights, power sockets, and other gizmos via addressable extensions to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO. Read more