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Bangalore readies for 'one of world's largest' FOSS events

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OSS

FOSS.IN, a Bangalore-based annual event that calls itself "one of the world's most focussed Free and Open Source Software events", has announced its Nov 23-25 meet will have 82 talks and tutorials.

Organisers of the FOSS.IN said they faced "truly a Herculean task to wade through the tonnes of amazing talks and tutorials". Many good talks were left out for unavailability of slots, said organisers.

By its sheer size and participation, FOSS.IN has become one of the largest and most focussed Free and Open Source Software events, held annually in India.

Over the years it has attracted thousands of participants and organisers assert that the speaker roster reads like a who's who of FOSS contributors from across the world.

Each year about 1,500 techies from what is India's closest equivalent of a Silicon Valley flock to the meet, marked by inexpensive entry fees, some geeky tech talks, and a chance for India's Open Source community from diverse states to meet up.

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