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Ubuntu 17.04 EoL and Patches

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Security
Ubuntu

The Spectre And Meltdown Server Tax Bill

  • The Spectre And Meltdown Server Tax Bill

    Much has been written about the nature of the Meltdown and Spectre threats, which leverage the speculative execution features of modern processors to give user-level applications access to operating system kernel memory. This is obviously a very big problem. Chip suppliers and operating system and hypervisor makers have known about these exploits since last June, and have been working behind the scenes to provide corrective countermeasures to block them. The idea was to wait until January 9 to have all the fixes lined up in the industry and then tell the world about the exploits. But rumors about the speculative execution threats forced the hands of the industry, and last week Google put out a notice about the bugs and then followed up with details about how it has fixed them in its own code for its own systems.

  • Answering your questions about “Meltdown” and “Spectre”

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