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Software: OpenGenus, StackEdit, Lightworks

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Software
  • OpenGenus Quark: The World’s First Offline Search Engine To Search Code

    You’re searching a code for your project online and the Internet connection is suddenly dropped. What would you do? Just sitting idle and waiting for the Internet connection to be back? Not necessary! Now, you can search your favorite code written in any language even if there is no Internet connection. Sounds awesome? Indeed! Say hello to “OpenGenus Quark” – the World’s first Offline Search Engine that helps you to search code for any algorithm or data-structure in your favorite language in seconds. Be it a C++ code, or Java or Python, OpenGenus Quark will instantly display a lot of sample codes in a matter of second. OpenGenus community is constantly adding more codes everyday. So if the code you’re looking for is not available, no worries! Just mail them and they will take care of it.

  • StackEdit – An In-Browser Markdown Editor for Professionals

    You might not have heard about PageDown before, but you must have heard about Stack Overflow and its sister sites. Well, PageDown is the Markdown library those services use. And it is also what StackEdit is based on.

    StackEdit is a full-featured modern, open-source Markdown editor and it is what is used by Stack Overflow and all its sibling sites.

  • New Lightworks RC3 Version 14.1 revision 102835 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!
  • Lightworks 14.1 Video Editor Steps Closer To Release

    The multi-platform, professional-grade Lightworks non-linear video editing system is getting close to releasing version 14.1.

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Google’s iron grip on Android: Controlling open source by any means necessary

Today, things are a little different. Android went from zero percent of the smartphone market to owning nearly 80 percent of it. Android has arguably won the smartphone wars, but "Android winning" and "Google winning" are not necessarily the same thing. Since Android is open source, it doesn't really "belong" to Google. Anyone is free to take it, clone the source, and create their own fork or alternate version. As we've seen with the struggles of Windows Phone and Blackberry 10, app selection is everything in the mobile market, and Android's massive install base means it has a ton of apps. If a company forks Android, the OS will already be compatible with millions of apps; a company just needs to build its own app store and get everything uploaded. In theory, you'd have a non-Google OS with a ton of apps, virtually overnight. If a company other than Google can come up with a way to make Android better than it is now, it would be able to build a serious competitor and possibly threaten Google's smartphone dominance. This is the biggest danger to Google's current position: a successful, alternative Android distribution. Read more

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