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Linux and Graphics (Phoronix)

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Linux
  • Systemd 237 Will Have Support For WireGuard

    The next release of systemd, v237, will introduce support for WireGuard. WireGuard as a reminder is the effort to provide a fast, modern and secure VPN tunnel that eventually plans to be part of the mainline Linux kernel.

    Systemd's networkd component recently merged patches for supporting WireGuard that have been in the works since September 2016. From the systemd perspective it's implementing support for the new "wireguard" interface type and supporting key management.

  • Some Of The Other Changes Slated For Linux 4.16

    There's still a week and a half to go until the Linux 4.15.0 stable kernel release is expected and that rings in the Linux 4.16 merge window. On top of various Linux 4.16 changes already talked about, here's a look at some of the other kernel features/additions expected for this next release cycle.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Planning For Release Next Month

    Ongoing Wayland/Weston release manager Bryce Harrington of Samsung's Open-Source Group has laid out plans for the next releases of Wayland and the reference Weston compositor.

    It's been a half-year since the release of Wayland 1.14 and Weston 3.0, so Bryce is trying to build up interest in getting out new releases in the weeks ahead.

  • NVIDIA Contributes Some New Tegra/Nouveau Patches

    It's not any re-clocking code or magical improvements for Nouveau's Pascal support, but on the Tegra side a NVIDIA developer has volleyed some new open-source patches.

  • Initial Intel Ice Lake PCH Support Posted
  • The Linux Graphics Stack Gets Further Meson-ized: Now With Libdrm Support

    The work on adding optional Meson build system support to the Linux graphics stack and other key open-source projects continues...

    Going back to last September has been work for Meson-izing Mesa as an alternative build system rather than Autotools, CMake, or SCons within Mesa. It's been delivering fast results and since the initial port landed more Mesa components have become supported by the Meson build.

  • Server-Side GLVND Updated While X.Org Server 1.20 Drags On

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat has sent out the second version of the ongoing patches for providing server-side GLVND functionality for the X.Org Server.

    Most of you faithful Phoronix readers should be familiar with GLVND, the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library. That's the effort led by NVIDIA and supported by others in the ecosystem for improving the "Linux OpenGL driver ABI" by allowing for multiple OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system without fighting over libGL.so. and the like. That's been going well but server-side GLVND for the X.Org Server takes things a step further.

  • A Look At Linux Hardware/Software Trends Over The Past Seven Years

    Here are some Linux hardware and software statistics going back to 2011.

More in Tux Machines

Google’s iron grip on Android: Controlling open source by any means necessary

Today, things are a little different. Android went from zero percent of the smartphone market to owning nearly 80 percent of it. Android has arguably won the smartphone wars, but "Android winning" and "Google winning" are not necessarily the same thing. Since Android is open source, it doesn't really "belong" to Google. Anyone is free to take it, clone the source, and create their own fork or alternate version. As we've seen with the struggles of Windows Phone and Blackberry 10, app selection is everything in the mobile market, and Android's massive install base means it has a ton of apps. If a company forks Android, the OS will already be compatible with millions of apps; a company just needs to build its own app store and get everything uploaded. In theory, you'd have a non-Google OS with a ton of apps, virtually overnight. If a company other than Google can come up with a way to make Android better than it is now, it would be able to build a serious competitor and possibly threaten Google's smartphone dominance. This is the biggest danger to Google's current position: a successful, alternative Android distribution. Read more

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