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OSDL Tags Fellowship Fund Donations for Linux Kernel Documentation

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OSDL fellowship will fill the gap for a long-awaited technical writer for Linux kernel

BEAVERTON, Ore., November 7, 2006 - The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a global consortium dedicated to accelerating the adoption of Linux® and open source software, today announced the first fellowship grant from its Fellowship Fund announced earlier this year. The one-year fellowship grant will sponsor a technical writer, whose work will be targeted at Linux kernel documentation, further accelerating and maximizing Linux development.

“The OSDL Fellowship Fund was created to meet the unfulfilled needs of Linux and open source software developers and provide resources to projects not funded or naturally sourced by the community development model,” said Stuart Cohen, CEO of OSDL. “We’re happy to see Linux kernel documentation be the first project funded because it aligns with the Fund’s purpose to fill unnecessary gaps and gives Linux users even greater confidence in the products they are buying.”

The fellowship position for a Linux kernel technical writer has been posted at https://www.osdl.org/about_osdl/jobs/linux-kernel-documentation-tech-writer. The contract position will include maintaining the documentation directory in the Linux kernel source tree with an emphasis on keeping current documentation up to date, creating new documentation and creating and maintaining tools such as kerneldoc scripts and Makefiles. The addition of this position will increase Linux kernel community collaboration by keeping documentation current and supplementing information that may be lacking.

The OSDL Fellowship Fund was established in March and has received public contributions from Google and HP. The OSDL board of directors, with input from the Technical Advisory Board (TAB), evaluates applications for fellowship funding and determines allocation priorities and levels of financial commitment. The TAB, an OSDL advisory board comprised of leading Linux and open source software developers, conducted new board elections at the Ottawa Linux Symposium (OLS) in July. Andrew Morton, Linux developer for Google and Linux kernel maintainer, is the TAB’s newest member.

"Linux kernel documentation is an area where the community has long voiced its desire for improvement, which the Fellowship Fund now makes it possible to address. Documentation is key to attracting new developers to Linux and easing the barriers to maintenance of the existing code. This fellowship will enable the recipient to improve the existing documentation via cooperation with the Linux community,” said James Bottomley, chair of the OSDL TAB and CTO at SteelEye.

OSDL will continue to accept pledges and secure financial support for the fund. For more information on how to donate to the Fellowship Fund or to apply for fellowship funding, please visit http://www.osdl.org/lab_activities/fellowship_fund/.

About Open Source Development Labs (OSDL)

OSDL – sponsor of Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel and other key Linux developers - is dedicated to accelerating the growth and adoption of Linux-based operating systems in the enterprise. Founded in 2000 and supported by a global consortium of major Linux customers and IT industry leaders, OSDL is a nonprofit organization that provides state-of-the-art computing and test facilities available to developers around the world. With offices in China, Japan and the United States, OSDL sponsors legal and development projects to advance open source software as well as initiatives for Linux systems in telecommunications, in the data center and on enterprise desktops. Visit OSDL on the Web at www.osdl.org.

OSDL is a trademark of Open Source Development Labs, Inc. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders.

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