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A More Positive gNewSense Review

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Linux
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A recent announcement on Distrowatch.com for a new distro called gNewSense perked my attention. It seems that the Free Software Foundation, the group headed by Richard M Stallman, otherwise known as RMS, sponsored this project and basically was conceived "due to Frustrated by many Linux distributions which include (or make it easy to include) non-free software in their products, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has decided to enter the Linux distribution market by sponsoring a new project called gNewSense. Based on Ubuntu Linux, the distribution, created by two Irish free software advocates Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley, released its first stable version last week. The gNewSense mailing list immediately witnessed a rapid surge in traffic, indicating that the interest in the project is reasonably high, even at this early stage. Most of the discussion is currently revolving around possible improvements to the project's infrastructure and advocacy. If you strongly believe in the four software freedoms as advocated by the FSF, then gNewSense looks like a perfect distribution to use and an exciting project to join" quoting from DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 176, 6 November 2006.

Now typically it is my practice to go over the install process as how any newbie to Linux might encounter, but since this is really an unbranded version of Ubuntu, that process can be followed along from in my Ubuntu review located here.

Instead, it is our goal to talk about the functionality of this distro, how it works on various machines compared to its proprietary ladened counterparts, and discuss a few topics about this gallant offering from Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley. Therefore our normal package of Installation will get the same score as Ubuntu at 4 Pennies, although this one did seem to go smoother on a machine where the Live CD actually started. More on that later.

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