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Slam-dunk for Linux - a review of Fedora Core 6

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Linux
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Microsoft’s next-generation Vista promises to deliver radically improved graphics for end-users, promising 3D-accelerated user interfaces and special effects that will dramatically improve the way a user relates to the computing experience, similar to what current owners of Apple Macintosh systems enjoy. Meanwhile on the Linux front, Red Hat and Novell have been spearheading the development of their own next-generation display subsystems, and Red Hat is the first to include it in a freely released operating system: Fedora Core 6.

A line has been drawn. Apple’s MacOS X and the free Linux desktop now possess modern 3D accelerated user interfaces that are absolutely top-notch, and Microsoft, as yet, does not. This marks the second time Microsoft has lagged behind Linux in terms of a major feature being shipped with its desktop OS (the first being desktop search, also integral parts of MacOS X and many Linux desktops), and it’s a clear indication that the times are beginning to change.

I say beginning, because the revolution is indeed just getting started. Linux has yet to be blessed with an overwhelming quantity of high-end commercial applications. It also has yet to reach that tipping point where the average user can sit down and make a pleasant remark about their Linux experience from beginning to end.

But with Fedora Core 6, the foundations for those two things have been set.

Full Story.

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