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Why linux can be updated without rebooting

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HowTos

One of the most frustrating things about installing or upgrading programs on certain operating systems is the constant need to have to reboot. This is especially true with drivers or system files. Why is it that linux can be upgraded without rebooting?

It all comes down to how linux and the file system handles files. When linux runs an executable it loads the whole file into memory and accesses it from there. This means that there is no connection to the physical file on the disk drive. When the program is closed and all connections to the file are cut the file is deleted from memory.

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