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Red Hat Celebrating the 20th anniversary of open source

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Red Hat
  • Celebrating the 20th anniversary of open source

    Twenty years ago, on Feb. 3, 1998, in a conference room in Palo Alto, Calif., the term “open source” was coined. Michael Tiemann (now vice president of open source affairs here at Red Hat), Todd Anderson, Chris Peterson of Foresight Institute, John "Maddog" Hall and Larry Augustin, both with Linux International, Sam Ockman with Silicon Valley Linux User's Group and Eric Raymond were reacting to the announcement by Netscape that it planned to “give away” the Netscape source code by releasing it to the public. From there, adoption of both the term and concept moved quickly and today, the open source community has tens of millions of members and contributors.

  • Open Source Turns 20 Years Old: How This Term Came Into Existence?

    The Open Source Initiative was formed in following days. People like Tim O’Reilly, Bruce Perens, and others played a pivotal role in popularising the term. Perens also adapted his Free Software Guidelines for Debian GNU/Linux to serve as Open Source Definition (OSD).

Open source in the realm of social justice

  • Open source in the realm of social justice

    Over the next 20 years, the open source movement must move beyond software into the realm of social justice, poverty alleviation and sustainable human development that leaves no one behind.

    That's the view of Nnenna Nwakanma, an open data, open government and the open Web across Africa advocate and co-founder of The Free Software and Open Source Foundation for Africa, and an Open Source Initiative (OSI) board member.

    Commenting on the 20th anniversary of the official recognition of open source software - as opposed to free software - Nwakanma said that "open" notion, practice and vision of open source had not only become mainstream, but had been a game changer.

    "Beyond software, hardware or processes, the fundamental ideology of openness is the most valuable for me, in vision, in meaning and in impact. The hundreds of tech hubs across the world and thousands of tech communities cannot be overlooked. We owe those to open source.

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