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The New KDE Slimbook II: A sleek and powerful Plasma-based Ultrabook

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KDE

To start with, it comes with a choice between an Intel i5: 2.5 GHz Turbo Boost 3.1 GHz - 3M Cache CPU, or an Intel i7: 2.7 GHz Turbo Boost 3.5 GHz with a 4M Cache. This makes the KDE Slimbook II 15% faster on average than its predecessor. The RAM has also been upgraded, and the KDE Slimbook now sports 4, 8, or 16 GBs of DDR4 RAM which is 33% faster than the DDR3 RAM installed on last year's model.

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Slimbook KDE Plasma Ultrabook

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    The KDE community and the Odin Group have announced a new version of the Slimbook, the KDE-branded laptop running Neon. While it's an improvement over last year's model, it's still a tough sell against other laptops/ultrabooks.

  • KDE Slimbook II is a thinner, lighter, faster Linux laptop

    A year after partnering with Spanish PC maker Slimbook to release a Linux-powered laptop that would ship with the KDE desktop environment out of the box, the KDE team and Slimbook are back with a new model.

KDE Slimbook II Plasma-Based Linux Ultrabook Laptop

  • KDE Slimbook II Plasma-Based Linux Ultrabook Laptop Is Cheaper, More Powerful

    As of today, there's a new KDE Slimbook Linux-powered, Plasma-based Ultrabook laptop available for sale and it comes with some impressive hardware specifications and a smaller price tag.

    Meet KDE Slimbook II, the second-generation of the KDE Slimbook laptop that emphasizes the widely-used KDE Plasma open-source desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. Build for running the KDE Neon Linux distro, the 1st-generation KDE Slimbook laptop was announced a year ago and offered some attractive features, including a 13.3-inch screen, faster SSDs, and latest Plasma desktop.

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