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Security: Telegram, Bounties and More

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Security
  • Telegram zero-day let hackers spread backdoor and cryptocurrency-mining malware

    A zero-day vulnerability in Telegram Messenger allowed attackers to spread a new form of malware with abilities ranging from creating a backdoor trojan to mining cryptocurrency.

    The attacks take advantage of a previously unknown vulnerability in the Telegram Desktop app for Windows and were spotted being used in the wild by Kaspersky Lab.

    Researchers believe the Russian cybercriminal group exploiting the zero-day were the only ones aware of the vulnerability and have been using it to distribute malware since March 2017 -- although it's unknown how long the vulnerability had existed before that date.

  • More Than 4,000 Government Websites Infected With Covert Cryptocurrency Miner

    The rise of cryptocurrency mining software like Coinhive has been a decidedly double-edged sword. While many websites have begun exploring cryptocurrency mining as a way to generate some additional revenue, several have run into problems if they fail to warn visitors that their CPU cycles are being co-opted in such a fashion. That has resulted in numerous websites like The Pirate Bay being forced to back away from the software after poor implementation (and zero transparency) resulted in frustrated users who say the software gobbled upwards of 85% of their available CPU processing power without their knowledge or consent.

    But websites that don't inform users this mining is happening are just one part of an emerging problem. Hackers have also taken to using malware to embed the mining software into websites whose owners aren't aware that their sites have been hijacked to make somebody else an extra buck. Politifact was one of several websites that recently had to admit its website was compromised with cryptocurrency-mining malware without their knowledge. Showtime was also forced to acknowledge (barely) that websites on two different Showtime domains had been compromised and infected with Coinhive-embedded malware.

  • Why Bug Bounties Matter

    Bugs exist in software. That's a fact, not a controversial statement. The challenge (and controversy) lies in how different organizations find the bugs in their software.

    One way for organizations to find bugs is with a bug bounty program. Bug bounties are not a panacea or cure-all for finding and eliminating software flaws, but they can play an important role.

  • Shell Scripting and Security

    The internet ain't what it used to be back in the old days. I remember being online back when it was known as ARPAnet actually—back when it was just universities and a handful of corporations interconnected. Bad guys sneaking onto your computer? We were living in blissful ignorance then.

    Today the online world is quite a bit different, and a quick glimpse at the news demonstrates that it's not just global, but that bad actors, as they say in security circles, are online and have access to your system too. The idea that any device that's online is vulnerable is more true now than at any previous time in computing history.

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 82 - RSA, TLS, Chrome HTTP, and PCI

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers, Mostly 'Spectre' and 'Meltdown' Related

  • More Meltdown/Spectre Variants
  • Spectre V2 & Meltdown Linux Fixes Might Get Disabled For Atom N270 & Other In-Order CPUs
    There's a suggestion/proposal to disable the Spectre Variant Two and Meltdown mitigation by default with the Linux kernel for in-order CPUs. If you have an old netbook still in use or the other once popular devices powered by the Intel Atom N270 or other in-order processors, there may be some reprieve when upgrading kernels in the future to get the Spectre/Meltdown mitigation disabled by default since these CPUs aren't vulnerable to attack but having the mitigation in place can be costly performance-wise.
  • Linux 4.17 Lands Initial Spectre V4 "Speculative Store Bypass" For POWER CPUs
    Following yesterday's public disclosure of Spectre Variant Four, a.k.a. Speculative Store Bypass, the Intel/AMD mitigation work immediately landed while overnight the POWER CPU patch landed.
  • New Variant Of Spectre And Meltdown CPU Flaw Found; Fix Affects Performance
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Gets First Kernel Update with Patch for Spectre Variant 4 Flaw
    Canonical released the first kernel security update for its Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system to fix a security issue that affects this release of Ubuntu and its derivatives. As you can imagine, the kernel security update patches the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system against the recently disclosed Speculative Store Buffer Bypass (SSBB) side-channel vulnerability, also known as Spectre Variant 4 or CVE-2018-3639, which could let a local attacker expose sensitive information in vulnerable systems.
  • RHEL and CentOS Linux 7 Receive Mitigations for Spectre Variant 4 Vulnerability
    As promised earlier this week, Red Hat released software mitigations for all of its affected products against the recently disclosed Spectre Variant 4 security vulnerability that also affects its derivatives, including CentOS Linux. On May 21, 2018, security researchers from Google Project Zero and Microsoft Security Response Center have publicly disclosed two new variants of the industry-wide issue known as Spectre, variants 3a and 4. The latter, Spectre Variant 4, is identified as CVE-2018-3639 and appears to have an important security impact on any Linux-based operating system, including all of its Red Hat's products and its derivatives, such as CentOS Linux.

LXQt 0.13 Desktop Environment Officially Released, It's Coming to Lubuntu 18.10

For starters, all of LXQt's components are now ready to be built against the recently released Qt 5.11 application framework, and out-of-source-builds are now mandatory. LXQt 0.13.0 also disabled the menu-cached functionality, making it optional from now on in both the panel and runner, thus preventing memory leaks and avoiding any issues that may occur when shutting down or restarting LXQt. Read more

GCC vs. LLVM Clang vs. AOCC Compilers On AMD Threadripper

Given recent improvements to AMD Zen (znver1) with LLVM, the new AMD AOCC 1.2 compiler release, and GCC 8.1 having premiered just weeks ago, here is a fresh look at the performance of six different C/C++ code compilers when testing the performance of the resulting binaries on an AMD Threadripper 1950X system. Read more