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Interview: Mozilla Lighting and OpenOffice.org

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Interviews

Conducted over the period following OOoCon 2006, where Michael Bemmer, the Engineering Director at Sun Microsystems and in charge of development of OpenOffice.org and StarOffice, presented the OpenOffice.org roadmap, this interview focuses on a particularly interesting element: a Personal Information Manager (PIM) that would work closely with OpenOffice.org. Stephan Schaefer, a lead engineer at Sun's Hamburg offices, graciously assisted in framing the questions; my thanks. I'd also like to thank the Mozilla Calendar community for helping with some of the answers. And of course my thanks to Michael.

During his OpenOffice.org roadmap presentation at the OpenOffice.org Conference in Lyon in September, Michael Bemmer mentioned the development of a Personal Information Manager (PIM). Can you tell us exactly what is under development?

We are currently contributing to the development of the Mozilla Lightning project. Mozilla Lightning is an extension for the Mozilla Thunderbird email client, and covers feature areas like calendaring and task handling including backend support. Thunderbird provides the email and address book functionality.

Support for various calendar servers and protocols will be added over time. Synchronization with PDAs is planned for the future, as well.

What led to the decision to develop a PIM?

Full Interview.

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