Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gentlemen, Start Your....Wireless Routers?—Tech at the Indy 500

Filed under
Sci/Tech

It's a big weekend here in Indianapolis. About this time each year, 33 men (and women) chase each other around the Brickyard in Indianapolis for about 3 hours while upwards of 250,000 of us get drunk and sunburned.

The technology of racing has never been lost on me, but this year there are some interesting developments in extreme technology at the Indy 500. Here are a few highlights:

  • Ultrafast WiFi routers are being used for telemetry in the Red Bull Cheever Racing car this year. The bandwidth afforded by the new Cisco routers can send over 180 channels of data from car to pits, including audio and video.

  • ABC is going all out to broadcast the event this year. New tech developments include a new 180-degree pan camera on the cars, and an ultralight wireless "balloon cam" that will ascend with the thousands of helium balloons that will be released during the opening ceremonies.
    Racing earplugs Delphi Earpiece Sensor System: a major advancement in safety.

  • XM Radio will provide live coverage of the race to its 4 million subscribers for the first time this year.
  • Safety is always a concern at the track. New earpieces worn by the drivers not only protect their hearing during the 500 miles of engine noise, but also contain embedded accelerometers that send g-force and other data immediately upon impact in the event of a crash. This information can be used to help determine the extent of possible head injuries.

  • The track was resurfaced last winter, which resulted in slick conditions on the 2.5 mile oval. To help increase traction, the entire track was diamond ground with diamond-tipped sawblades to rough the surface up a bit.
  • Even the crash test dummies are more high tech this year.

  • Of course, the Indy Racing League (IRL) provides live timing and scoring online if you are stuck in front of a computer this weekend.
    Have a great weekend and enjoy the race.

Source with lots of live links.

Further Coverage.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report
    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far. Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.
  • Galago Pro: Look Inside
    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!
  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted

Making GNU/Linux Look Nice

Lumina Desktop Gets lumina-mediaplayer

  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: lumina-mediaplayer
  • Lumina Desktop Gets Its Own Media Player
    There's now yet another open-source media player, but this time focused on the BSD-focused Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment. Lumina Media Player is one of the new additions for the upcoming Lumina 1.3. Lumina Media Player's UI is quite simple so far and allows playing of local audio/video files along with basic audio streaming -- currently implemented for Pandora.

today's howtos