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Programming/Development: GSoC 2018, LLVM, GitLab and More

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Development
  • Student Applications For GSoC 2018 Now Open

    If you are a university student and would like to pursue a career in Linux/open-source software development, a great way to get a jump-start on that is through Google's annual Summer of Code program. Student applications for GSoC 2018 are now being accepted.

  • What’s new in LLVM

    The LLVM compiler framework has gone from being a technological curiosity to a vital piece of the modern software landscape. It is the engine behind the Clang compiler, as well as the compilers for the Rust and Swift languages, and provides a powerful toolkit for creating new languages.

    It is also a fairly fast-moving project, with major point revisions announced every six months or so. Version 6.0, released earlier this month, continues LLVM’s ongoing mission to deepen and broaden support for a variety of compilation targets. The update also adds many timely fixes to guard against recently discovered processor-level system attacks.

  • GitLab: 2018 is the year for open source and DevOps

    DevOps and open source aren’t slowing down anytime soon, a newly released report revealed. GitLab released its 2018 Global Developer Survey on developers’ perception of their workplace, workflow, and tooling within IT organizations.

    The demand for DevOps continues to grow, even though there are still challenges created by outdated tools and company resistance to change. According to the report, only 23 percent identify DevOps as their development methodology. However, IT management has named DevOps as one of the top three areas of investment in 2018, indicating that the number of DevOps adopters is sure to grow this year.

  • 11 considerations for picking the right technology

    There are myriad open source projects available for just about every component of a modern software stack—the array of choices can be dizzying, especially when starting from scratch or making many choices at once. With the above criteria in mind, however, you should be better equipped to think rationally about your needs and how each of your options might or might not suit them. Happy hunting!

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updated

  • Tumbleweed Delivers New Kernel, Applications, Plasma, libvirt
    The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users. Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes. The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30 package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3 3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.
  • OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Jumps On Linux 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Riding Well
    For users of openSUSE's Tumbleweed rolling-release Linux distribution, it's been a very busy month on the update front. Last week openSUSE Tumbleweed already upgraded to the phenomenal KDE Plasma 5.13 release as its default desktop along with KDE Applications 18.04.2.

CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 Released for Those Who Want to Run Linux Containers

Coming about a month after the release of the CentOS Linux 7.5 (1804) operating system for 64-bit (x86_64), 32-bit (i386), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit (ppc64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64le), and ARM-hfp (armhfp) compatible machines, CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is now available to download. CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is built from standard CentOS Linux 7 RPMs and the upstream packages included in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.5 operating system. CentOS Linux is a free and open-source computer operating system for desktops and servers that's always based on the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases. Read more

Fedora Core OS: The New Upstream To Red Hat's CoreOS

Not to be confused with Fedora Core going back to the early days of Fedora as a Red Hat project, but Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller has just announced Fedora CoreOS. Fedora CoreOS is going to be the new upstream for CoreOS, which Red Hat acquired Core OS / Container Linux earlier this year. Matthew Miller expects that over the next year, Fedora Atomic Host will be replaced by "a new thing" combining the best of Container Linux and Project Atomic. With that new thing is Fedora CoreOS. Read more

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